Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

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DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

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Friday, October 30, 2015

Discover CAMP MANITOU - A week-long summer camp for grieving boys




Experience Camps are one-week summer camps for boys who have lost a parent, sibling or loved one that help build confidence, encourage laughter, and navigate grief through friendship, teamwork, activities, and the common bond of loss.

We provide support to grieving boys through summer camps, year-round programs, and online support.



Read an article about Camp Manitou in the Wall Street Journal:


WILEY CERILLI always experiences a little bit of nervous excitement the first day of summer camp.
There is usually some anxiety in meeting new people, said Mr. Cerilli, a 34-year-old venture capitalist and entrepreneur. At the same time, camp is a blast, he said, with swimming, soccer and nightly s'mores. Central Maine's Belgrade Lakes area is stunning during the waning days of summer, he said, and Camp Manitou itself, a 67-year-old upscale sleep-away summer camp for boys, is the kind of place you'd happily pay to visit to as an adult (and bring all of your friends) if you're an outdoorsy, athletic kind of guy, as Mr. Cerilli is. 

But for the New Yorker, the magic is not the 100 acres of pine-and-birch woods, cool lakes and big grassy fields, but the chance to meet boys and teenagers who are reluctant members of Mr. Cerilli's tribe: young men who have lost a parent, sibling or other loved one. Mr. Cerilli was 16 when his father died of lung cancer. 

As he has for the past five summers, next month Mr. Cerilli will volunteer as a camp counselor with the Manitou Experience, a program begun in 2009 that takes over the site for one week a summer and hosts about 300 grieving boys, ages 9 to 17. The mission of camp is to "play games, be a kid and not feel different," explained Mr. Cerilli, who recalled not wanting to "stand up" and admit he needed help when his father died. "You're the kid in school that lost a parent," he said. "I didn't want people feeling bad for me." Today he serves on the board of the organization, which holds camps in Maine, California and, starting next year, New York.

KEEP READING THE ARTICLE HERE AT THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

from Camp Manitou's website:

Experience Camps provide boys who have lost a parent, sibling or loved one with a program that helps build confidence, encourage laughter and navigate their grief through friendship, teamwork, athletics, and the common bond of loss.

It is a safe environment where kids can explore their grief, break the isolation they may feel with their non-camp peers, and have a whole lot of fun. They have the opportunity to meet and connect with kids who are coping with similar challenges, while getting all of the benefits of the traditional summer camp experience. Through team sports, individual challenges and community living they learn about leadership, confidence and cooperation. Under the guidance of professional bereavement staff, campers have the opportunity to share stories and remember the one who died, while exploring skills that will help them after camp.

The program is designed to maximize each camper’s time with his bunkmates to give him time to bond and build the trust that leads to open communication. Boys often build those bonds through sports and activities, which are a main component of the day. Campers can play their favorite games, such as basketball, soccer and baseball, as well as explore new activities, like rock climbing, waterskiing, and archery. A full day of fun and rewarding activity takes place in the beautiful outdoors, surrounded by accepting friends, supportive counselors and fresh air.

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