Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

ENTER YOUR EMAIL TO SUBSCRIBE AT THE RIGHT

BELIEVE YOU BELONG!

BE CURIOUS ABOUT THE WORLD!

AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE CLICK "OLDER POSTS" TO SEE MORE CONTENT!

DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

EMAIL: dogstarcontact@gmail.com

DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

IMPORTANT NOTICE OF NON COMMERCIAL & EDUCATIONAL CONTENT Unless otherwise stated, we do not own copyrights to any of the visual or audio content that might be included on this blog. Dog Star is for criticism, commentary, reporting and educational purposes under the FAIR USE ACT: Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. If you own the copyright to any images and object to them being included in this blog, please advise and the content will be removed. No attempt is made for material gain from this blog's content.

Saturday, September 5, 2015

What Is College Worth?

A good read that injects some interesting ideas into the debate about how much a college degree really matters.  Unfortunately, it adds up to the same conventional wisdom and muddles through a few research studies to support some obvious assertions.

Read The New Yorker article here:  WHAT IS COLLEGE WORTH? and then read my take-away (my own thoughts about the college journey).

My take away:

1.  College tuition fees must be eliminated for qualified community college students.  We will likely see this happen in the next 5-10 years.

2.  Whatever the feelings or beliefs about how we're living in "the Matrix" and it's all rigged, a college degree is still the best chance for social mobility especially for those living in poverty.

3.  WHERE you get your undergraduate degree doesn't matter unless you attend Ivy league (top recruiters only look at prestige schools).

4.  If you are not attending Ivy League for undergrad then save the money and pretentious and go to a CUNY / SUNY.  Only the most specialized programs like Songwriting at NYU's Clive Davis School would make NYU a better choice than Brooklyn College (as long as songwriting and the music industry is what you want to be doing).

5.  Unless you genuinely love the field, ignore all advice from parents and family to major in accounting, actuary, pre-law, pre-med or business.  Centuries of evidence proves that a liberal arts degree (bachelors in English, history, foreign language, art history) give college grads greater capacity for creative thinking and more flexibility for a variety of jobs.

6.  It matters where you go for GRADUATE SCHOOL (unless you will become a teacher, for example, since the degree is a matter of credentials and licensing not a matter for boosting your resumé - for public teachers it just doesn't matter where you go).  Grad school is when the serious attention to the field happens and where you will make connections for professional jobs.

7.  Finish your bachelors degree in four years.  Seriously.  The longer you take to finish the degree you are reducing the return on the college investment.  You are losing those earnings and not taking advantage of the degree.  The longer you take to get the degree (and have not graduated) you remain in the same employee pool as a high school graduate.  Wake up.

8.  If you start college, finish college.  The only thing worse than not going to college at all is starting a degree, dropping out and you still have college loan debt.  Debt without a degree is just stupid.  Not a smart move.

9.  Don't expect your college degree to get you the job you want.  A variety of factors have conspired against college graduates to make sure that many college grads work in fields that don't actually require a degree (i.e. barista, secretarial, medical and nursing technicians, bookkeeping).  Since so many more people attend college - although less than half graduate in four years - there are way more college grads than available jobs.  And the number of jobs formerly available for highly skilled, socially trained college grads is shrinking fast.

10.  If you train too narrowly for a field you risk hitching your wagon - your whole life plan and career aspirations - to the ups and downs of that industry (see #5).  For example, those who major in hospitality, culinary, engineering and accounting all face downsizing if these industries experience a major shift in technology or loss of capital (income).  Keep it in mind.

No comments: