Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

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DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

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Monday, July 13, 2015

Something to Declare - Your Passport to Global Culture: Mid-Century Jewish Temple Design



Kneses Tifereth Israel is a classic example of 1950s synagogue design that reflects the growth in American Jewish life in the post-war era when more than 500 synagogues were built throughout the United States. 

Philip Johnson (1906-2005) was one of the leading American voices for Modernism, first as head of the Museum of Modern Art's architecture and design department in the 1930s, and subsequently as a leading architect. Kneses Tifereth Israel was his only synagogue design. He undertook the commission for no fee as a public atonement to the Jewish people for his pro-fascist activities in the 1930s. 

In its adoption of a Modernist style, the Port Chester congregation reflected the movement at the time to develop new themes and forms appropriate to the contemporary synagogue.




Johnson designed the Torah ark (of English oak decorated with bronze Hebrew letters made by Ibram Lassaw) and other furnishings including a number of bimah chairs of English oak. The letters affixed to front of the ark doors compose four Biblical acrostics, which translate: "God is one and His name is One / The Fear of the Lord is the Prerequisite to Wisdom / Shun Evil and do Good / For This is the Whole Man." The numerical value of the letters adds up to 613. In 2006, when Kneses Tifereth Israel decided to renovate the sanctuary, the Lassaw and Johnson suite (with the exception of the menorah sculpted by Lassaw) was sold to The Jewish Museum.


The group of objects in photo above - the wall screen, the Torah ark and the chairs - are on permanent view at The Jewish Museum - always free on Saturdays.


Ibram Lassaw (American, b. Egypt, 1913-2003) was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1913 to Russian Jewish parents, and came to the United States in 1921. Lassaw is best known for his open-space welded sculptures in bronze, nickel silver, and other alloys. He worked on the Federal Arts Project of the Public Works Administration and served in the army during World War II. A founder of the American Abstract Artists in 1936, he is most closely associated with Abstract Expressionist sculptors Seymour Lipton, Herbert Ferber, and David Hare. Among post-war artists, Lassaw was the one to maintain the most consistent theoretical basis for his art, drawing on such intellectual sources as Taoist and Zen teachings and the psychology of Jung.

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