Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

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DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

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Sunday, February 8, 2015

Artist Creates New Music from Sampled YouTube Videos (Kutiman - Thru You Too - GIVE IT UP)

For Ophir Kutiel, a stylistically omnivorous musician and producer based in Tel Aviv, conventional sampling – taking a musical fragment from an existing recording to help build a new one – is kids’ stuff. Mr. Kutiel, who performs and records under the name Kutiman, has transformed sampling into a multimedia art, building his songs from bits of YouTube clips – the video as well as the audio – with amateur and instructional videos as his favored sources. 

The new track refines what Kutiman has been doing to some acclaim – and, for several of his earlier songs, roughly a million and a half YouTube hits – since 2009, when he completed his first collection, “Thru YOU.” 

It begins with a singer introducing her song and giving it a tentative title, “Give It Up,” then cuts to a 6-year-old girl in a pink party dress playing an elegant, Chopinesque figure from what a screen title says is an improvisation. Kutiman edits the figure into a repeating loop that becomes a hypnotic bed for the song. 

Added over the course of the song are the unwitting contributions of three drummers of various ages and proficiency; and performers on acoustic and electric basses and guitars, trombone and tuba (each in short bursts); an old-fashioned synthesizer, which adds occasional bleeps; a string ensemble; a high-school saxophonist from whom a short but hot figure is lifted; and an acoustic piano, all supporting a bluesy vocal. 

All these lines, including the vocal, are manipulated: you can see the picture jerk along with Kutiman’s editing and looping. But the finished piece is a fully produced song with a hook (thanks to the 6-year-old pianist) that makes it memorable. 

A spokesman for Kutiman said that the musician does not seek permission to use snippets from performers’ clips, but has not had any complaints. “As far as he and his manager are aware,” the spokesman said, “these people are excited to see what Kutiman has done with their videos.” 

No money changes hands: he does not sell them commercially, or allow advertisements or sponsor links on either his YouTube page or his website. 
via The New York Times

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