Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

EMAIL: dogstarcontact@gmail.com

DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

IMPORTANT NOTICE OF NON COMMERCIAL & EDUCATIONAL CONTENT Unless otherwise stated, we do not own copyrights to any of the visual or audio content that might be included on this blog. Dog Star is for criticism, commentary, reporting and educational purposes under the FAIR USE ACT: Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. If you own the copyright to any images and object to them being included in this blog, please advise and the content will be removed. No attempt is made for material gain from this blog's content.

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Dog Star Selects Yasuo Kuniyoshi






Dog Star is a big fan of Kuniyoshi and it's also fun to imagine how he fit into the bohemian culture of Greenwich Village in the 1930s and 1930s.
 
He is the best known Japanese American painter of the interwar years!

Born in Okayama, Japan in 1893, Kuniyoshi moved to the United States as a teenager and settled first on the West Coast. He discovered his calling as an artist and enrolled as a student at the California School of Art and Design in Los Angeles. He eventually moved to New York City and studied at the Art Students League, the school with which he would be associated for the rest of his career.

Kuniyoshi's most distinctive work of the early 1920s blends elements of American folk tradition, Japanese prints, and the lines and angles of European modernism (specifically, Cubism). A part-time resident of Maine, he was drawn to the countryside of his adopted homeland. Earth tones, warm colors, cows, lighthouses, bathers on the beach, are all aspects of his work during this time.


In photo below:  Yasuo Kuniyoshi in his studio at 20 East 14th Street in New York City on October 31, 1940.





Being Japanese in America in the years leading up to the war brought its own share of difficulties. When Kuniyoshi married his fellow Art Student League class member Katherine Schmidt in 1919, she lost her citizenship for marrying an alien ineligible for citizenship himself. During World War II, the government classified Kuniyoshi as an enemy alien. He was placed under surveillance and his bank account was impounded. Only by helping the Office of War Information with propaganda art and broadcasting pro-democracy messages through the radio could Kuniyoshi avoid the internment camps.

In 1948, the Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective of Kuniyoshi's work — the Whitney's first solo show for a living American artist at that time and the first for an Asian American. After 1949, there was a shift in Kuniyoshi's style toward brighter, more vivid primary colors and images of clowns, reminiscent of the themes seen in some of the works of Picasso and Aleksander Rodchenko.

When Kuniyoshi passed away in 1953, he had established himself as an artist who defied broad categories and easy generalizations during one of the most tumultuous periods in modern American history.



Friday, May 30, 2014

Dog Star Selects THE KUNSTHALLE

Oh, you know, that little art gallery down the street...KUNST (art) HALLE (gallery) - The Kunsthalle, Düsseldorf, Germany. Look above the doorway for Kunstalle and pause to appreciate the victory angel with a wreath of laurel at the top of the roof.  (Pronounced koonst-hal, as in shall).

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Dog Star College Series: Is College Worth It? Clearly, New Data Say (NY Times)


Some newly minted college graduates struggle to find work. Others accept jobs for which they feel overqualified. Student debt, meanwhile, has topped $1 trillion.

It’s enough to create a wave of questions about whether a college education is still worth it.

A new set of income statistics answers those questions quite clearly: Yes, college is worth it, and it’s not even close. For all the struggles that many young college graduates face, a four-year degree has probably never been more valuable.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE AT THE NEW YORK TIMES

Calm: A Field of Liquid Construction Debris



What looks like a giant pile of rubble outside the Shangri-La Hotel in downtown Vancouver is actually an art installation by Chinese art collective MadeIn Company titled Calm. All is not as it seems. Pass by in a hurry and you’ll hardly notice this giant pile of broken cement blocks, grass, and construction waste, but stand next to it for just a moment and you’ll notice something almost imperceptible: the entire pile of rubble is moving, slightly undulating atop a giant hidden reservoir of water.

The large field of debris was collected from a renovated Vancouver synagogue and installed on an exhibition space, Offsite, belonging to the Vancouver Art Gallery last April. According to various news reports people seem pretty polarized by the installation, either loving or hating it. The work was inspired by the near perpetual state of urban development currently underway in China. 

Via the gallery:
Calm’s ambiguity and unexpected ability to move provoke us to question ways of observing, believing and understanding facts, and remind us that the truth often differs from what it seems. In this context, Calm comments on the concerns that arise alongside urban development and the gentrification of residential neighbourhoods, whether in Vancouver or Shanghai. While the volume of construction in Vancouver might pale in comparison and scale to that of Shanghai, there are currently several retail and residential expansions underway within a five-kilometre radius of Offsite.