Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

EMAIL: dogstarcontact@gmail.com

DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

IMPORTANT NOTICE OF NON COMMERCIAL & EDUCATIONAL CONTENT Unless otherwise stated, we do not own copyrights to any of the visual or audio content that might be included on this blog. Dog Star is for criticism, commentary, reporting and educational purposes under the FAIR USE ACT: Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. If you own the copyright to any images and object to them being included in this blog, please advise and the content will be removed. No attempt is made for material gain from this blog's content.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Did Yoga Help the Seahawks Win the Super Bowl? YES!




Above:  Quarterback Russell Wilson in the lotus position.

This is from an ESPN Magazine story on the Seattle Seahawks back in August:
 

High-performance sports psychologist Mike Gervais, dressed in a navy Seahawks hoodie and white baseball cap and flashing more enthusiasm than is rational at this hour, welcomes players into a meeting room at the Virginia Mason Athletic Center.

Gervais is about to lead a meditation session and, as he always does, instructs the players to hit record on their phone voice-recorder apps and to close their eyes. Then he starts guiding them: "Quiet your minds," "Focus your attention inwardly" and "Visualize success."



Guess it worked, right?


Body Language





Thursday, March 27, 2014

Look at this Instagram

Brilliant parody! Put the phone down! The obsession with food pics, random objects and body parts becomes a strange bubble in which a person really does not actually live in the real world only the one "filtered" by the devices. Last night I went to a concert at a place in Chelsea called Highline Ballroom and they FORBID ANYONE from filming with cameras and cellphones. So refreshing!


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Cupcake ATM on the Upper East Side Now Open

See more information here.


Dog Star Selects Pablo Picasso's "Three Musicians" (Museum of Modern Art)

Uncredited Photographer
Pablo Picasso Standing In Front of His Painting, “Three Musicians,” Paris (1922).

“The academic teaching on beauty is false. We have been misled, but so completely misled that we can no longer find so much as a shadow of a truth again.

The beauties of the Parthenon, the Venuses, the Nymphs, the Narcisusses, are so many lies.

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty, but what the instinct and the brain can conceive independently of that canon… To tell the truth the Parthenon is only a truss on which a roof has been placed.”

- Pablo Picasso, Boisgeloup, France 1934

Monday, March 24, 2014

Great Architect Has Won Top Prize for His Work - Discover Shigeru Ban



So happy to hear that Shigeru Ban has won the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize.  I did not know he designed a condo in Manhattan (pic above).  He created one of my favorite contemporary buildings - the Centre Pompidou Metz which I enjoyed so much with my friend Sofy (pic below).




The Metal Shutter Houses on 19th Street in Chelsea, Mr. Ban’s first condominium project in Manhattan. individual perforated shutters slide  over the balconies to conceal the apartments.

The 2010 Pompidou Center satellite museum in Metz, France. Its roof was inspired by a woven bamboo hat.


Each year the Pritzker goes to a living architect whose work has contributed to humanity and the built environment. Mr. Ban will receive a $100,000 grant and a bronze medallion to be awarded on June 13 in a ceremony at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. 

Read the article at The New York Times

Juicy J - One of Those Nights ft. The Weeknd

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Afraid of Dark Film Trailer

Afraid of Dark, is a wonderfully insightful and entertaining, yet remarkably serious, documentary about Black men. This documentary, aims to destroy the misconceptions and stereotypes about black men that have often cost black men their lives by offering a genuine look at them from my eyes to the outside world, revealing the beauty in diversified strength, leadership and challenges; A reality that has often been distorted by others.  Why is the world so afraid of dark?

http://www.afraidofdarkthefilm.com/



A Photo Essay of West African Barbershops












Saturday, March 22, 2014

Can't make the block hot and then get mad when the cops show up

This article on HuffingtonPost uses Spike Lee's comments about gentrification in Brooklyn to make several points about the racially-motivated crimes against communities in all cities.

One of the points it makes is that there is a higher rate of arrest of black and Latino males for low-level drug offenses (selling weed) than there is for whites.

The article mentiosn the subculture of hipster whites who serve as "couriers" quietly and udner the radar of police in the same neighborhoods where black and Latino males get arrested:  Bed-Stuy, Williamsburg, Bushwick...these are all gentrified areas where police presence is high.

But pause and look beyond the racism and have some common sense about what attracts police attention: gang-on-gang violence and revenge shootings and the killing of innocent bystanders from gun violence. 

We all know white hipster cannabis couriers on their artisanal bicycles are NOT shooting at each other at Bedford & N. 6th.

Drug dealers who are a public menace - whatever their color - will definitely attract police attention. The "quiet, underground hipster" drug culture will not attract police attention.

How to Be an Explorer


“Smart” Phones and Narcissism







New Yorkers love their gadgets and none more than their fancy new phones. While we love IT as an effective tool, we’ve noticed on the subway a creepy stillness that has engulfed social life in public spaces. 


A note to all of you staring at your smartphones when you are with real people: that machine you so love is just a modern version of the Narcissus’ mirror; a tool for self-involved distraction that turns into an addiction. 

Yes, we are saying you are more or less staring into a mirror when you look at that thing! Get your head’s out of your asses before, like you predecessor, you end up floating in your own self-delusion!

This means stop checking email, text messages and social media every 2 minutes.  This means stop updating social media CONSTANTLY.  This means stop trying to "follow" who is "following" you and stop "following" others on Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

A beautiful world awaits you on the other side of the screen!

Friday, March 21, 2014

THE GIVER Movie Trailer

re-posted from Gothamist:

Before Katniss Everdeen and Beatrice Prior fought and kicked their way onto the big screen, Lois Lowry introduced young readers to The Giver, one of, if not the, first dystopian novels for the YA set. After a million years of being trapped in production hell, the trailer for a much-anticipated film adaption—starring none other than Meryl Streep and Jeff Bridges—has finally been released. And like its paperback counterpart, it seems promising enough to freak out a whole new legion of fifth graders.

The Newbery Medal-award winning 1993 novel, which follows the story of a boy named Jonas who learns the unsettling truth about his highly-controlled community after being selected as the community's Receiver of memory, seems to have been given a few updates in its cinematic adaption. Jonas is twelve in the book, for instance, though in the film he's played by 24-year-old Brenton Thwaites, and the trailer hints at a more adult romance (kissing!) than the mere pubescent "stirrings" Jonas experiences in the novel. Streep's character, the Chief Elder, comes off as far more evil in the trailer than her more minor counterpart in the novel, and it's surprising that the whole movie is filmed in color, considering the absence of color plays a pretty significant role in the story.

Small quibbles aside, the trailer is appropriately eerie, and it's pretty exciting to see Bridges—who co-produced the film—dolled up as the titular Giver who puts Jonas on his revelatory path. We'll even forgive the inclusion of Taylor Swift, who has a small, but somewhat significant roll in the film. It'll be a little harder to get over Katie Holmes as Jonas's mother, but they probably needed to save room in the budget for all those cool body-snatching helicopters.

The film is set to be released in August.




Thursday, March 20, 2014

Happy In New York City

Five Paintings We Love @ The Frick - Bring your friends and family!

Dog Star enjoys The Frick Collection because it NEVER changes its permanent collection - it always has on view the paintings Henry Clay Frick selected and placed within his home.  

This does not mean the Frick doesn't have room for special exhibitions; it has separate spaces for temporary little shows.  We want devoted readers to visit the Frick to see these paintings in person - for yourself.  

The descriptions of the paintings are taken from the museum's website.  

Here is a photo of the West Gallery - imagine having this room in your home as your private art collection.  It's just ONE of the rooms you will see at the Frick:
 


   
The Frick welcomes quiet and respectful teens who put away all electronics, check their coats and bags and enjoy this very special museum as if they are visiting a stranger's home.  The Frick is open to ALL NEW YORKERS!

The Frick Collection (more here) is EASY TO REACH at 70th Street and Fifth Avenue - take the 6 train to 68th Street / Hunter College and walk over to 5th Avenue from Lexington & 68th. Admission for teens is $10 (students with valid identification).  Dog Star says go early on Sundays and pay just $1!  On Sundays, pay what you wish from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Learn more about the Frick family and origins of the collection and museum here.  The museum was planned as a permanent art collection to be open to the public by its founder Henry Clay Frick!



PAINTING #1 - ABOUT THE PAINTING ABOVE:  Lodovico Capponi painted by Agnolo Bronzino. This proud young aristocrat is Lodovico Capponi (b. 1533), a page at the Medici court. As was his custom, he wears black and white, his family's armorial colors. His right index finger partially conceals the cameo he holds, revealing only the inscription sorte (fate or fortune) — an ingenious allusion to the obscurity of fate. In the mid 1550s Lodovico fell in love with a girl whom Duke Cosimo had intended for one of his cousins. After nearly three years of opposition, Cosimo suddenly relented, but he commanded that their wedding be celebrated within twenty-four hours.   

WHY WE LOVE IT: We like to think that Frick chose this painting of Capponi because of its association with one of the most powerful families in history.  The Medici family of the Italian Renaissance ruled over the region of Florence / Tuscany and nobody did anything without their permission.  They made a fortune owning farms, mills, textile (tapestry) companies and family members were even connected to the Vatican in Rome.  Frick most likely admired this young man and may have seen an aspect of himself in the picture:  bold, proud and ready for the upper classes!


PAINTING #2 - ABOUT THE PAINTING ABOVE: Gilbert Stuart  (1755 - 1828) George Washington, 1795-1796  Stuart earned a fortune producing replicas of the three portraits he painted from life of the first President of the United States. The Frick canvas is thought to be one of two copies painted by the artist for the Philadelphia merchant John Vaughan. It belongs to the group known as the “Vaughan type,” although it differs from the related versions in the color of the coat and in the treatment of the background. Stylistically the portrait recalls the work of Stuart’s English contemporaries, such as Romney and Hoppner.

WHY WE LOVE IT: The first thing to know is that the portrait of Washington on the one dollar bill is by Gilbert Stuart - same artist.  We like this painting because it shows our first president in a red velvet coat and we like to think Frick liked that, too.



PAINTING #3 - ABOUT THE PAINTING ABOVE: Johannes Vermeer  (1632 - 1675) Mistress and Maid, 1666-1667  The subject of writing and receiving letters, which recurs frequently in Vermeer’s work, is given an exceptional sense of dramatic tension in this painting of two women arrested in some moment of mysterious crisis. The lack of final modeling in the mistress’ head and figure and the relatively plain background indicate that this late work by Vermeer was left unfinished. Nevertheless, the artist seldom if ever surpassed the subtly varied effects of light seen here as it gleams from the pearl jewelry, sparkles from the glass and silver objects on the table, and falls softly over the figures in their shadowy setting. Bought by Mr. Frick in 1919, the year of his death, this painting was his last purchase and joined Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait, Holbein’s Sir Thomas More, Bellini’s St. Francis, and Velázquez’ King Philip IV among his favorite acquisitions.

WHY WE LOVE IT: Frick had exquisite taste and bought the very best paintings.  His taste in art is strongly conservative; by the time of his death in 1919 cubism and abstratcion were very popular but he would never have bought those kinds of pictures - he did not have a taste for "modern" art.  But there is just no disputing the beauty of a Vermeer - the way he handles the light so delicately!



PAINTING #4 - ABOUT THE PAINTER/ING ABOVE: Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn  (1606 - 1669) Self-Portrait, 1658.  Rembrandt first studied art in his native Leyden and later worked under Pieter Lastman in Amsterdam. Around 1625 he returned to Leyden, but in 1631/32 he settled permanently in Amsterdam. Although he enjoyed a great reputation and pupils flocked to him, he suffered financial difficulties that led to insolvency in 1656. By 1660 most of his debts were settled, and his last years were spent in relative comfort. Rembrandt painted many portraits, biblical scenes, and historical subjects.

WHY WE LOVE IT: This painting was completed about ten years before the painter died.  By the time he painted it his career had long been over.  And yet Rembrandt makes himself look so majestic, so regal like a king who is still at the top of his game.


PAINTING #5 - ABOUT THE PAINTING ABOVE: Jean-August-Dominique Ingres  (1780 - 1867) Comtesse d'Haussonville, 1845Louise, Princesse de Broglie (1818–82) and granddaughter of Madame de Staël, married at the age of eighteen. Her husband was a diplomat, writer, and member of the French Academy, and she herself published a number of books, including biographies of Robert Emmet and Byron. For her time and her elevated social caste, she was outspokenly independent and liberal. This portrait, begun in 1842, was the fruit of several false starts and a great many preparatory drawings, including full-scale studies of the raised left arm, the head, and its reflection. According to a letter written by the artist, the finished work “aroused a storm of approval among her family and friends.” Ingres appears to have surprised the young lady in the intimacy of her boudoir, where she leans against an upholstered fireplace, having just discarded her evening wrap and opera glasses.  


WHY WE LOVE IT: This painter's last name is pronounced eng-ah.  It's so easy to see why Frick would have loved this painting and why we love it, too.  The Comtesse is so beautiful and so charming in this portrait while also hinting that she is ready and willing to have an intelligent conversation.

Dog Star Selects “Trippin’ in Texas”

Monday, March 17, 2014

Dog Star Selects Picasso in Cannes

Pablo Picasso photographed in his studio near Cannes, France in 1956. The Thonet rocking chair in the distance appears in many of his paintings.  (Cannes is pronounced kahn.)

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Lie Witness News - SXSW Edition

Get On Up Trailer

Turkish Oil Wrestlers

Every June in Edirne, Turkey is a traditional oil wrestling tournament. They get pretty angry that it gets labeled "homoerotic" (there are tons of photos and videos online if you want to see more of this non-sexual wrestling). 

We like this one (from a series) by Magnum photographer Paolo Pellegrin taken during the three-day tournament in Kirkpinar, Edirne, Turkey 2011.   In the foreground, of course, is the physically fit wrestler with the traditional leather pants (custom made for each wrestler) but also the depth of vision - you can see so far back into the sidelines and imagine the cheering crowds!

The "Kirkpinar Oil Wrestling" tournament, held in Kirkpinar, near Edirne, since 1362, is the oldest continuously running sporting competition in the world. 

The wrestlers (called Pehlivan, from the Persian term meaning "hero" or " champion") gather from all over Turkey, fighting in front of a huge crowd of people for three days in June, to win the gold belt and the title of "Chef Pehlivan". They pour olive oil over their entire bodies to prevent any grip from the opponent. The ultimate goal is to pin down the opponent's shoulders to the ground for three seconds.

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Bill Cunningham's FACADES


In this new photo exhibition at the New York Historical Society we see NYC in a unique way:  a model dressed in period clothing from the same time as the time period of the building or structure in the picture.  So that fantastic mound of a hat in front of the Guggenheim Museum is from the 1950s when the museum was finished.  Same for the image above in the NYC sunway in the 1970s - she's dressed in early 20th century (1904?) fashion because that's when the subway was finished in most parts of the city.

These are four of my favorite images - either because the clothing contrasts so sharply with the setting (like the subway) or compliments it seamlessly like the hat in front of the Mercury statue high atop Grand Central Station.













The photographer, of course, is the legendary Bill Cunningham who began this project in 1968 with a friend (the model).

My words are inadequate next to the lucid and engaging review by Glenn O'Brien in the NY Times.


Go here for a link to the museum.

Admission is usually $18 but if you plan ahead it can be just $1!
Admission is pay-as-you-wish from 6-8 pm on Fridays.

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West & 77th Street.
Across the street on the south side of Museum of Natural History.


On view now until June 15.

New Year! New Art! Must-See Museum Shows of 2014

Dog Star knows everyone gets a little LESS busy as soon as the new year begins.  Maybe you'll make time to see one of these museum exhibitions?

It's a new year for new art!

This can be your guide to exhibitions at NYC's museums this Winter/Spring 2014 and a checklist to be sure you see the ones you want before they close.

THIS IS A PRINTER-FRIENDLY POST.  All text in black to make it easy to print the list and keep it in your agenda or to refer to it and make dates to see these exhibitions with family and friends.

All of the museums have a free or pay-what-you-wish (it can be just $1) night so be sure to check the website - it is linked in BOLD in the name of the museum.

You may read about artists here that you've never heard of before - that's a good reason to check it out.  Read the list and make a plan to see at least three to start - pick one you are excited about seeing and invite your family.  

Choose another one and invite two friends to join you!  

On the third go by yourself - it will be an entirely different experience and you be doing less socializing, less talking, less talking ABOUT the art and MORE LOOKING. 

And always keep your phone in your pocket.  It's tough to make a real connection to the artwork if you are texting, taking pictures or researching.  

Give yourself the chance to have a "phone-free" experience with art.

Finally, we've added one line called WHY GO? to express in a few words what's special, unusual or a rare opportunity to encourage devoted Dog Star readers to see an exhibition.


Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China
Metropolitan Museum of Art
December 11, 2013–April 6, 2014
Featuring some seventy works by thirty-five artists in various media—paintings, calligraphy, photographs, woodblock prints, video, and sculpture—created during the past three decades, the exhibition is organized thematically into four parts: The Written Word, New Landscapes, Abstraction, and Beyond the Brush. Although all of the artists have challenged, subverted, or otherwise transformed their sources through new modes of expression, Ink Art seeks to demonstrate that China's ancient pattern of seeking cultural renewal through the reinterpretation of past models remains a viable creative path.
WHY GO?  Bust the stereotypes you may have of China and Chinese culture and discover another side to this diverse and creative place.

William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time
Metropolitan Museum of Art
October 22, 2013–May 11, 2014
At the center of the installation is a moving sculpture—the "breathing machine" or "elephant"—an organ-like automaton with a pumping bellows. Plans from the 1870s for copper pneumatic tubes under the streets of Paris that would pump regular bursts of air to calibrate the city's clocks reminded Kentridge of a passage from Charles Dickens's novel Hard Times (1854). Dickens describes a factory machine moving "monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness"—a metaphor for the often convulsive developments in science and industry during the modern era and a reminder of the vain impulse to control time.
WHY GO?  You have never seen anything like this exhibition - it will inspire you!

The Little Prince: A New York Story
The Morgan Library & Museum
January 24 - April 27, 2014
This exhibition of the original manuscript and watercolor drawings—the most comprehensive ever mounted—explores the American origins of a story that reminds us that what matters most can only be seen with the heart.
WHY GO?  Anybody who knows the famous story or wants to discover a classic will want to see this wonderful little show.

A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play
The Morgan Library & Museum
February 14 through May 18, 2014
A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play signals the debut of photography as a curatorial focus at the Morgan. With over eighty works from more than two dozen collections arranged into a surprising chain of visual associations, the exhibition explores the many ways of interpreting a photograph and pays tribute to the unique role played by the creative collector. Each photograph in the exhibition's "collective invention" shares a visual or conceptual quality with the piece to its left, another with the one to its right. Embodying photography's rich history and wide range of applications in science, art, propaganda, journalism, and self-promotion, A Collective Invention celebrates a medium that mirrors the energy and complexity of modern life.
WHY GO?  Since the Morgan began as one man's collection and photography wasn't part of it originally, the curators have decided to use this as an advantage rather see it as a disadvantage.  It will be fun and engaging to see how these images "talk to each other."

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties 
Brooklyn Museum 
March 7–July 6, 2014
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties offers a focused look at painting, sculpture, graphics, and photography from a decade defined by social protest and American race relations. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this exhibition considers how sixty-six of the decade’s artists, including African Americans and some of their white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and Caribbean contemporaries, used wide-ranging aesthetic approaches to address the struggle for racial justice.
WHY GO?  An amazing opportunity to engage with a time period of American history and culture that is so misunderstood!

City as Canvas
Museum of the City of New York
February 4 - August 24, 2014
Martin Wong (1946–1999), an East Village artist and visionary collector of graffiti art, amassed a collection of hundreds of works on paper and canvas just as street art was becoming a worldwide cultural phenomenon in the 1980s. Wong’s archive is a unique treasure that provides a window into a vibrant subculture and documents the process of young outlaws becoming mature artists. City as Canvas: Graffiti Art from the Martin Wong Collection highlights works in aerosol, ink, and other mediums by seminal figures in the movement, including Keith Haring, Lee Quiñones, Lady Pink, and Futura 2000, as well as photographs that capture work long since erased from walls and subways. Wong donated his collection to the City Museum in 1994.
WHY GO?  See original work by truly original NYC artists from an exciting time in the city.

Two Exhibitions at International Center of Photography (ICP)
International Center of Photography (ICP)
Both have same exhibition dates January 31–May 4, 2014

Capa in Color 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.
WHY GO?  Add a special show to your photography education and discover Capa!

What Is a Photograph?
Organized by ICP Curator Carol Squiers, What Is a Photograph? will explore the intense creative experimentation in photography that has occurred since the 1970s. Conceptual art introduced photography into contemporary art making, using the medium in ways that challenged it artistically, intellectually, and technically and broadened the notion of what a photograph could be in art. A new generation of artists began an equally rigorous but more aesthetically adventurous analysis, which probed photography itself—from the role of light, color, composition, to materiality and the subject. What Is a Photograph? brings together these artists, who reinvented photography.
WHY GO?  Discover artists who do bold, original and innovative work! 

“For Forgetting,” Laure Provoust
New Museum
February 12 – April 13, 2014
The non-linear narratives of Turner prize winner Laure Prouvost’s films often  create moving experiences through startling manipulations of sound and imagery. For her first solo museum presentation in the U.S., the artist will show a new work in the Lobby Gallery of the New Museum, “For Forgetting,” an immersive multichannel video installation that explores “slippages in memory and arbitrary distinctions of power and possession.” While her work “Wantee” was the sleeper hit of the 2013 Turner Exhibition, this new installation will likely come much higher expectations.
WHY GO?  It's fresh and engaging and it will be totally new for you!

The 2014 Whitney Biennial
Whitney Museum of American Art
March 7 – May 25, 2014
The last Biennial to take place at the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer-designed home at 975 Madison Avenue will feature works and projects by 103 artists and collectives, and will be shaped by three curators not affiliated with the Museum.  This Biennial will have more artist collectives than ever before, and will include performances throughout the building, along with sound pieces and a contemporary opera. There will be much experimentation across disciplines — writers painting, filmmakers creating sculpture, drawings by photographers — and projects by new media ventures like Triple Canopy. And some of the exhibition will extend beyond the walls of the museum, like artist Tony Tasset’s outdoor sculpture, to be shown in Hudson River Park.
WHY GO?  Such a giant exhibition will have many, many surprises - some bad but mostly good!

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
The Guggenheim Museum
January 24 – May 14
Over the last thirty years, Carrie Mae Weems has been created a diverse and affecting body of work — beginning with documentary photography and broadening out into a range of mediums including text, audio, digital imagery, fabric, installation, and video — in an ongoing exploration of class, race, sexism, politics, and gender. This show, the first comprehensive retrospective for the artist (which kicked off in January at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nahville), will present more than 200 works, with a focus on photography and video. It will include some of Weems’s earliest documentary series, like a group of as-of-yet unpublished images inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Roy DeCarava, as well as her well-known 1990 set “The Kitchen Table Series.”
WHY GO?  A hugely talented artist who deserves more attention for her work!

Maria Lassnig
MoMA PS1
Opens March 9
Fresh from her lifetime achievement award at the 2013 Venice Biennale, nonagenarian German painter Maria Lassnig will be the subject of this 50-painting survey focused on her sustained practice of metaphysical self-portraiture. Lassnig's dark and playful renderings of her own body, made up of loose brushstrokes in soft greens, reds, pinks, and blues against stark white backdrops, are often ominously distorted or accompanied by strange, symbolic accessories, from a dancing skeleton to a hamster.
WHY GO?  Go see what she's about and discover her world!

Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937
Neue Galerie
March 13 – June 30
The Neue Galerie is putting on an exhibition of works that were originally part of Adolf Hitler’s infamous 1937 exhibition of modern art, which presented paintings and sculptures condemned as degenerate by the Nazi party. The new show, curated by scholar and Neue Galerie board member Dr. Olaf Peters, will be the first large-scale take on this subject in the U.S. since the highly regarded 1991 show “Degenerate Art: The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. At the Neue Galerie, the so-called degenerate art will be presented alongside officially sanctioned art of the period.
WHY GO?  A unique way to view history - through an art show the Nazis presented that was actually more popular with the public that the "acceptable art" show!

Zhang Huan
Storm King
Opens May 3
The starting point for this exhibition — organized by Storm King director David R. Collens and the Asia Society’s museum director, Melissa Chiu — is the Chinese contemporary artist Zhang Huan’s “Three-Legged Buddha” (2007). Weighing over 12 tons, this gargantuan copper and steel sculpture, which Storm King acquired in 2010, will be the centerpiece of a display of outdoor sculptures similarly inspired by the subject of the Buddha — Zhang is a Ju Shi Buddhist. Other works will fill the rooms of the Museum Building.  The works in this show, mostly created since 2005, were inspired by Zhang’s travels through Tibet, where he viewed remnants of Buddhist statuary destroyed during the Cultural Revolution.
WHY GO?  A special sculptor in a very special setting!

Other Primary Structures
The Jewish Museum
March 14 – August 3
Revisiting the Jewish Museum’s 1966 show “Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors” — a watershed exhibition that brought artists like Carl Andre, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt their first major attention — this show will revisit that cultural moment however from a far more global perspective. The first exhibition at the museum curated by its deputy director, Jens Hoffmann, it will include artists from Latin America, Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Exploring the legacy of the mostly American and British abstract sculptors in the first show, the new show will examine their influence on artists who worked at the same time in other countries, whose work has been little known or seen in the US.
WHY GO?  Opens up the idea of who is a "Jewish artist" by including many who work outside the United States.

Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New
Museum of Modern Art
December 21, 2013–April 21, 2014
During a career spanning half a century, Ileana Sonnabend (1914–2007) helped shape the course of postwar art in Europe and North America. A gallerist and noted collector, Sonnabend discovered and championed many of the most significant artists of her time. Among the important works she owned is Robert Rauschenberg's Combine Canyon (1959), which the Sonnabend family donated to The Museum of Modern Art in 2012. In celebration of this extraordinary gift, Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New explores Sonnabend’s legendary eye through selected works of art that she presented in her eponymous galleries in Paris and New York.
WHY GO?  Celebrates a woman who had a big influence on how we see art from the 1960s through the 1980s because her gallery influenced what collectors bought and what museums put on display.

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
February 1–June 1, 2014
Through an initial selection of drawings, films, and large-scale architectural models, the exhibition examines the tension in Wright’s thinking about the growing American city in the 1920s and 1930s, when he worked simultaneously on radical new forms for the skyscraper and on a comprehensive plan for the urbanization of the American landscape titled “Broadacre City.” Visitors encounter the spectacular 12-foot-by-12-foot model of this plan, which merges one of the earliest schemes for a highway flyover with an expansive, agrarian domain. Promoted and updated throughout Wright’s life, the model toured the country for several years in the 1930s, beginning with a display at Rockefeller Center. This dispersed vision is paired with Wright's innovative structural experiments for building the vertical city.
WHY GO?  We need to better understand how to plan city living for the future - and Wright helps us do that by showing alternatives.

Nalini Malani: Transgressions
Asia Society 
February 19, 2014 - August 3, 2014
Nalini Malani (b. 1946 in Karachi, Pakistan; lives and works in Mumbai, India) is one of the foremost contemporary women artists from India. Her practice utilizes allegory and symbolism as metaphors to explore issues relating to gender, class, and race in a post-colonial world. Formally, her work spans the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and works on paper. This exhibition will feature Transgressions II (2009), a multimedia installation from the Asia Society Museum Collection. This three-channel video integrates the folk sensibility of traditional shadow plays with new technology, creating a mesmerizing projection of colors and shadows. The exhibition will also feature a selection of Malani's artist books. This presentation will represent the artist's first solo museum exhibition in New York in over a decade.
WHY GO?  Discover non-European art in a special place on Park Avenue.

Two Exhibitions at the New York Historical Society
New York Historical Society

Bill Cunningham: Façades 
March 14, 2014 - June 15, 2014
In 1968, photographer Bill Cunningham embarked on an eight-year project to document the architectural riches and fashion history of New York City. Scouring the city’s thrift stores, auction houses, and street fairs for vintage clothing, and scouting sites on his bicycle, Cunningham generated a photographic essay entitled Façades, which paired models—in particular his muse, fellow photographer Editta Sherman—in period costumes with historic settings.
WHY GO?  Enjoy NYC landmarks in a unique way!

The Black Fives
March 14, 2014 - July 20, 2014
This exhibition covers the pioneering history of the African American basketball teams that existed in New York City and elsewhere from the early 1900s through 1950, the year the National Basketball Association became racially integrated. Just after the game of basketball was invented in 1891, teams were often called “fives” in reference to their five starting players. Teams made up entirely of African American players were referred to as “colored fives,” “Negro fives,” or black fives—the period became known as the Black Fives Era.
WHY GO?  Sports history doesn't usually get this kind of exhibition - it will be fascinating. 

Two Exhibitions at Schomburg Center in Harlem
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Funky Turns 40: Black Character Revolution
February 5 - June 14, 2014
From 1900 to 1960, Hollywood’s greatest animators and biggest studios produced more than 600 cartoon shorts featuring black characters. These films reflected the racial stereotypes of the pre–Civil Rights Era, portraying blacks as less than human and as minstrel caricatures. It wasn’t until the late 1960s and early 1970s that Saturday morning television cartoons featured black animated characters in a positive and realistic manner. Funky Turns 40, from the Museum of Uncut Funk, explores these black animated characters and the impact they had on a generation of young folk.
WHY GO?  Discover a whole generation of TV that started ti include African American characters!

Motown: The Truth Is A Hit
February 1 - July 26, 2014 Courtesy of the Motown MuseumMotown founder Berry Gordy is quoted as saying “The truth is a hit.” And in truth, Detroit’s Motown Records became the voice of an entire generation. Our upcoming Motown exhibition, The Truth Is a Hit seeks to explore Gordy’s notion of the truth by tracing black Music from its African roots through slavery, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, urban America, the Civil Rights and anti-war movements, up to the present day.
WHY GO?  Music history is always fun and this exhibition will be fascinating to discover singers and songwriters again or for the first time.

The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888
Museum of Chinese in America
October 23, 2013 - April 13, 2014
The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888 showcases Harold L. Lee and Sons, Inc., a cornerstone of Chinatown. Founded in 1888, this year marks the company’s 125th anniversary. MOCA will present a selection of photographs and artifacts from the business, tracing its rise from a small foreign exchange business to national insurance brokerage. The exhibition will take place in MOCA’s recreated general store: a space fashioned to represent an old New York storefront with tin ceilings, built-in wooden cabinets, and brick walls.
WHY GO?  What a special way to learn about how one family reflects a culture!

Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master Painter
February 27 - May 18, 2014
National Academy
By the turn of the 20th century, the success of Anders Zorn (1860-1920) rivaled that of the most famous artists of his day, including John Singer Sargent. A virtuoso watercolorist, bravura painter, and etcher, Zorn had risen from humble beginnings in the Swedish countryside to travel the world, captivate American artists and politicians alike, and paint some of the most sought after portraits of America’s Gilded Age. This major retrospective features more than 90 rarely seen works and brings to light the work of a master, long overlooked in America.
WHY GO?  Sargent is a master so to compare Zorn to Sargent means he is a BEAST!  Go see it!  It will be very traditional paintingbut it will also add much beauty to your life!

The Art of Video Games
Hudson River Museum - Yonkers 
February 15 - May 18, 2014
One of the first major exhibitions to explore the 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, The Art of Video Games focuses on the medium’s striking graphics, creative storytelling, and player interactivity.  The Art of Video Games features the most influential artists and designers across five eras of game development, from early pioneers to the contemporary artists, who created some of the best games for 20 gaming systems that range from the Atari VCS to PlayStation 3.
WHY GO?  Discover or re-discover the world of video games.  And EASY TO REACH from Grand Central Station!

Metro-North Hudson Line from Grand Central Terminal to Glenwood Station. Walk 1 block east on Glenwood Avenue; turn left onto Ravine Avenue . At the end of Ravine Avenue , turn left into Trevor Park. Follow path to museum entrance.  Make your visit a One-Day Getaway, and get a combined rail and admission discount ticket. Click here for details.


How Do You Get Poor Kids to Apply to Great Colleges?

Caroline Hoxby and her team of researchers are revolutionizing the way the best colleges reach out to talented low-income students

By Nancy Hass

Sometimes, late at night, you stare out your window at the black Nebraska sky and wonder if you really are a freak like everyone at school says. It’s not just the pile of Jane Austens under your bed that you’ve read till the pages are ragged or the A’s you’ve racked up in everything from chemistry to AP history. It’s your stubborn belief that there’s more out there than homecoming, keggers and road trips to the mall 80 miles away in Lincoln. Your mom is sympathetic but between cleaning floors at the nursing home and taking care of your little brothers, she has even less time than she has money.

Your dad? Last you heard, he was driving a forklift at a Hy-Vee in Kansas City.

You scored 2150 on your SATs, highest anyone around here remembers, so it will be easy to get into the state school a couple of towns away. But maybe you’ll go to the community college close by so you can save a little money and help your mom out—and it would save having to take out loans to pay for tuition. Pretty much everyone winds up dropping out eventually anyway. By the time you’re 19 or 20, it’s time to start bringing home a paycheck, earn your keep.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE AT SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Orestes Pursued by the Furies by John Singer Sargent


All Star Code Program this Summer for Young Men of Color Interested in Tech

A PREP PROGRAM CONNECTING YOUNG MEN OF COLOR TO THE TECH INDUSTRY

All Star Code is a non-profit initiative that prepares qualified minority boys for full-time employment in the technology industry by providing mentorship, industry exposure, and intensive training in computer science. We are dedicated to closing the opportunity gap between young men of color and the tech industry.

All Star Code Summer Program for Grade 10 & 11 Latino and Black Males Interested in Technology Careers

ALL STAR CODE’S
SUMMER INTENSTIVE PROGRAM
July 7th – August 15th, 2014
Your path to a career in the tech sector begins now.
This Summer Intensive is geared toward equipping you with the basic skills you’ll need to embark on the journey of becoming an innovative engineer, programmer and tech leader.
Develop a real grasp of computer science and interpersonal skills
Receive mentorship from tech professionals and guest speakers
Build digital applications that you’ll be proud to show your family and friends
Make new friends
Discover new professional talents and skills
Become a leader

Summer Intensive Overview
July 7th – August 15th, 2014
9am – 5pm each weekday
Hands-on, project based learning with your peers
200+ hours of instruction in computing concepts, programming fundamentals, mobile phone development, robotics, web development, and design
Field trips to technology companies and recreation centers

Deadline for application is April 3.



ANNIE Trailer

Annie doesn't open until Xmas. The clip already has 2M YouTube views, partly because of the racists who are very upset that Annie is played by ten year-old black actress Quvenzhané Wallis, who in 2012 became the youngest-ever recipient of an Best Actress Oscar nomination for Beasts Of The Southern Wild. Will Smith and Jay-Z are the film's producers.


Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Teen from Sierra Leone CREATES His Own Future

This will definitely brighten up your day! Watch ALL of the video - so if you don't have time right now open the browser and leave it open to come back to it.
What's happening with Kelvin in the video is exactly what's missing in NYC schools: he learns by making. He built his own generator and created a FM radio station from parts he found in the trash.

The video and his story also inspired this idea: form grade teams in a school and each one meets to solve one of the school's toughest challenges. So, for example, the 9th grade team meets to create solutions, perhaps, on creating a safe and engaging tone/atmosphere in the school. 10th grade team might work on solutions for "building community" with art/mural projects.



Dog Star Selects László Moholy-Nagy's "Nuclear II"

László Moholy-Nagy Nuclear II (1946). Oil on canvas. Milwaukee Art, Milwaukee. ©Hattula Moholy-Nagy/VEGAP 2011.



Monday, March 10, 2014

Memory Wound



Back in 2011 a gunmen set off a bomb in Oslo, Norway and then traveled to Utoya Island and opened fire:

"A lone political extremist bombed the government center here on Friday, killing 7 people, the police said, before heading to an island summer camp for young members of the governing Labor Party and killing at least 80 people."

Here is a link to the NY Times story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/23/world/europe/23oslo.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Now, a Swedish artist has created an incredible - jaw dropping - memorial by slicing away part of the island as a "Memory Wound."

It's really worth reading the whole project description and looking at the images created for the proposal.

I really like the way the memorial creatively implicates the island itself and uses a pathway for a contemplative experience about the tragedy.

Go here for more:
http://www.designboom.com/art/jonas-dahlberg-slices-memory-wound-utoya-island-norway-july-22-memorial-site-03-06-2014/

New Year! New Art! Must-See Museum Shows of 2014

Dog Star knows everyone gets a little LESS busy as soon as the new year begins.  Maybe you'll make time to see one of these museum exhibitions?

It's a new year for new art!

This can be your guide to exhibitions at NYC's museums this Winter/Spring 2014 and a checklist to be sure you see the ones you want before they close.

THIS IS A PRINTER-FRIENDLY POST.  All text in black to make it easy to print the list and keep it in your agenda or to refer to it and make dates to see these exhibitions with family and friends.

All of the museums have a free or pay-what-you-wish (it can be just $1) night so be sure to check the website - it is linked in BOLD in the name of the museum.

You may read about artists here that you've never heard of before - that's a good reason to check it out.  Read the list and make a plan to see at least three to start - pick one you are excited about seeing and invite your family.  

Choose another one and invite two friends to join you!  

On the third go by yourself - it will be an entirely different experience and you be doing less socializing, less talking, less talking ABOUT the art and MORE LOOKING. 

And always keep your phone in your pocket.  It's tough to make a real connection to the artwork if you are texting, taking pictures or researching.  

Give yourself the chance to have a "phone-free" experience with art.

Finally, we've added one line called WHY GO? to express in a few words what's special, unusual or a rare opportunity to encourage devoted Dog Star readers to see an exhibition.


Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China
Metropolitan Museum of Art
December 11, 2013–April 6, 2014
Featuring some seventy works by thirty-five artists in various media—paintings, calligraphy, photographs, woodblock prints, video, and sculpture—created during the past three decades, the exhibition is organized thematically into four parts: The Written Word, New Landscapes, Abstraction, and Beyond the Brush. Although all of the artists have challenged, subverted, or otherwise transformed their sources through new modes of expression, Ink Art seeks to demonstrate that China's ancient pattern of seeking cultural renewal through the reinterpretation of past models remains a viable creative path.
WHY GO?  Bust the stereotypes you may have of China and Chinese culture and discover another side to this diverse and creative place.

William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time
Metropolitan Museum of Art
October 22, 2013–May 11, 2014
At the center of the installation is a moving sculpture—the "breathing machine" or "elephant"—an organ-like automaton with a pumping bellows. Plans from the 1870s for copper pneumatic tubes under the streets of Paris that would pump regular bursts of air to calibrate the city's clocks reminded Kentridge of a passage from Charles Dickens's novel Hard Times (1854). Dickens describes a factory machine moving "monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness"—a metaphor for the often convulsive developments in science and industry during the modern era and a reminder of the vain impulse to control time.
WHY GO?  You have never seen anything like this exhibition - it will inspire you!

The Little Prince: A New York Story
The Morgan Library & Museum
January 24 - April 27, 2014
This exhibition of the original manuscript and watercolor drawings—the most comprehensive ever mounted—explores the American origins of a story that reminds us that what matters most can only be seen with the heart.
WHY GO?  Anybody who knows the famous story or wants to discover a classic will want to see this wonderful little show.

A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play
The Morgan Library & Museum
February 14 through May 18, 2014
A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play signals the debut of photography as a curatorial focus at the Morgan. With over eighty works from more than two dozen collections arranged into a surprising chain of visual associations, the exhibition explores the many ways of interpreting a photograph and pays tribute to the unique role played by the creative collector. Each photograph in the exhibition's "collective invention" shares a visual or conceptual quality with the piece to its left, another with the one to its right. Embodying photography's rich history and wide range of applications in science, art, propaganda, journalism, and self-promotion, A Collective Invention celebrates a medium that mirrors the energy and complexity of modern life.
WHY GO?  Since the Morgan began as one man's collection and photography wasn't part of it originally, the curators have decided to use this as an advantage rather see it as a disadvantage.  It will be fun and engaging to see how these images "talk to each other."

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties 
Brooklyn Museum 
March 7–July 6, 2014
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties offers a focused look at painting, sculpture, graphics, and photography from a decade defined by social protest and American race relations. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this exhibition considers how sixty-six of the decade’s artists, including African Americans and some of their white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and Caribbean contemporaries, used wide-ranging aesthetic approaches to address the struggle for racial justice.
WHY GO?  An amazing opportunity to engage with a time period of American history and culture that is so misunderstood!

City as Canvas
Museum of the City of New York
February 4 - August 24, 2014
Martin Wong (1946–1999), an East Village artist and visionary collector of graffiti art, amassed a collection of hundreds of works on paper and canvas just as street art was becoming a worldwide cultural phenomenon in the 1980s. Wong’s archive is a unique treasure that provides a window into a vibrant subculture and documents the process of young outlaws becoming mature artists. City as Canvas: Graffiti Art from the Martin Wong Collection highlights works in aerosol, ink, and other mediums by seminal figures in the movement, including Keith Haring, Lee Quiñones, Lady Pink, and Futura 2000, as well as photographs that capture work long since erased from walls and subways. Wong donated his collection to the City Museum in 1994.
WHY GO?  See original work by truly original NYC artists from an exciting time in the city.

Two Exhibitions at International Center of Photography (ICP)
International Center of Photography (ICP)
Both have same exhibition dates January 31–May 4, 2014

Capa in Color 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.
WHY GO?  Add a special show to your photography education and discover Capa!

What Is a Photograph?
Organized by ICP Curator Carol Squiers, What Is a Photograph? will explore the intense creative experimentation in photography that has occurred since the 1970s. Conceptual art introduced photography into contemporary art making, using the medium in ways that challenged it artistically, intellectually, and technically and broadened the notion of what a photograph could be in art. A new generation of artists began an equally rigorous but more aesthetically adventurous analysis, which probed photography itself—from the role of light, color, composition, to materiality and the subject. What Is a Photograph? brings together these artists, who reinvented photography.
WHY GO?  Discover artists who do bold, original and innovative work! 

“For Forgetting,” Laure Provoust
New Museum
February 12 – April 13, 2014
The non-linear narratives of Turner prize winner Laure Prouvost’s films often  create moving experiences through startling manipulations of sound and imagery. For her first solo museum presentation in the U.S., the artist will show a new work in the Lobby Gallery of the New Museum, “For Forgetting,” an immersive multichannel video installation that explores “slippages in memory and arbitrary distinctions of power and possession.” While her work “Wantee” was the sleeper hit of the 2013 Turner Exhibition, this new installation will likely come much higher expectations.
WHY GO?  It's fresh and engaging and it will be totally new for you!

The 2014 Whitney Biennial
Whitney Museum of American Art
March 7 – May 25, 2014
The last Biennial to take place at the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer-designed home at 975 Madison Avenue will feature works and projects by 103 artists and collectives, and will be shaped by three curators not affiliated with the Museum.  This Biennial will have more artist collectives than ever before, and will include performances throughout the building, along with sound pieces and a contemporary opera. There will be much experimentation across disciplines — writers painting, filmmakers creating sculpture, drawings by photographers — and projects by new media ventures like Triple Canopy. And some of the exhibition will extend beyond the walls of the museum, like artist Tony Tasset’s outdoor sculpture, to be shown in Hudson River Park.
WHY GO?  Such a giant exhibition will have many, many surprises - some bad but mostly good!

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
The Guggenheim Museum
January 24 – May 14
Over the last thirty years, Carrie Mae Weems has been created a diverse and affecting body of work — beginning with documentary photography and broadening out into a range of mediums including text, audio, digital imagery, fabric, installation, and video — in an ongoing exploration of class, race, sexism, politics, and gender. This show, the first comprehensive retrospective for the artist (which kicked off in January at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nahville), will present more than 200 works, with a focus on photography and video. It will include some of Weems’s earliest documentary series, like a group of as-of-yet unpublished images inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Roy DeCarava, as well as her well-known 1990 set “The Kitchen Table Series.”
WHY GO?  A hugely talented artist who deserves more attention for her work!

Maria Lassnig
MoMA PS1
Opens March 9
Fresh from her lifetime achievement award at the 2013 Venice Biennale, nonagenarian German painter Maria Lassnig will be the subject of this 50-painting survey focused on her sustained practice of metaphysical self-portraiture. Lassnig's dark and playful renderings of her own body, made up of loose brushstrokes in soft greens, reds, pinks, and blues against stark white backdrops, are often ominously distorted or accompanied by strange, symbolic accessories, from a dancing skeleton to a hamster.
WHY GO?  Go see what she's about and discover her world!

Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937
Neue Galerie
March 13 – June 30
The Neue Galerie is putting on an exhibition of works that were originally part of Adolf Hitler’s infamous 1937 exhibition of modern art, which presented paintings and sculptures condemned as degenerate by the Nazi party. The new show, curated by scholar and Neue Galerie board member Dr. Olaf Peters, will be the first large-scale take on this subject in the U.S. since the highly regarded 1991 show “Degenerate Art: The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. At the Neue Galerie, the so-called degenerate art will be presented alongside officially sanctioned art of the period.
WHY GO?  A unique way to view history - through an art show the Nazis presented that was actually more popular with the public that the "acceptable art" show!

Zhang Huan
Storm King
Opens May 3
The starting point for this exhibition — organized by Storm King director David R. Collens and the Asia Society’s museum director, Melissa Chiu — is the Chinese contemporary artist Zhang Huan’s “Three-Legged Buddha” (2007). Weighing over 12 tons, this gargantuan copper and steel sculpture, which Storm King acquired in 2010, will be the centerpiece of a display of outdoor sculptures similarly inspired by the subject of the Buddha — Zhang is a Ju Shi Buddhist. Other works will fill the rooms of the Museum Building.  The works in this show, mostly created since 2005, were inspired by Zhang’s travels through Tibet, where he viewed remnants of Buddhist statuary destroyed during the Cultural Revolution.
WHY GO?  A special sculptor in a very special setting!

Other Primary Structures
The Jewish Museum
March 14 – August 3
Revisiting the Jewish Museum’s 1966 show “Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors” — a watershed exhibition that brought artists like Carl Andre, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt their first major attention — this show will revisit that cultural moment however from a far more global perspective. The first exhibition at the museum curated by its deputy director, Jens Hoffmann, it will include artists from Latin America, Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Exploring the legacy of the mostly American and British abstract sculptors in the first show, the new show will examine their influence on artists who worked at the same time in other countries, whose work has been little known or seen in the US.
WHY GO?  Opens up the idea of who is a "Jewish artist" by including many who work outside the United States.

Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New
Museum of Modern Art
December 21, 2013–April 21, 2014
During a career spanning half a century, Ileana Sonnabend (1914–2007) helped shape the course of postwar art in Europe and North America. A gallerist and noted collector, Sonnabend discovered and championed many of the most significant artists of her time. Among the important works she owned is Robert Rauschenberg's Combine Canyon (1959), which the Sonnabend family donated to The Museum of Modern Art in 2012. In celebration of this extraordinary gift, Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New explores Sonnabend’s legendary eye through selected works of art that she presented in her eponymous galleries in Paris and New York.
WHY GO?  Celebrates a woman who had a big influence on how we see art from the 1960s through the 1980s because her gallery influenced what collectors bought and what museums put on display.

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
February 1–June 1, 2014
Through an initial selection of drawings, films, and large-scale architectural models, the exhibition examines the tension in Wright’s thinking about the growing American city in the 1920s and 1930s, when he worked simultaneously on radical new forms for the skyscraper and on a comprehensive plan for the urbanization of the American landscape titled “Broadacre City.” Visitors encounter the spectacular 12-foot-by-12-foot model of this plan, which merges one of the earliest schemes for a highway flyover with an expansive, agrarian domain. Promoted and updated throughout Wright’s life, the model toured the country for several years in the 1930s, beginning with a display at Rockefeller Center. This dispersed vision is paired with Wright's innovative structural experiments for building the vertical city.
WHY GO?  We need to better understand how to plan city living for the future - and Wright helps us do that by showing alternatives.

Nalini Malani: Transgressions
Asia Society 
February 19, 2014 - August 3, 2014
Nalini Malani (b. 1946 in Karachi, Pakistan; lives and works in Mumbai, India) is one of the foremost contemporary women artists from India. Her practice utilizes allegory and symbolism as metaphors to explore issues relating to gender, class, and race in a post-colonial world. Formally, her work spans the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and works on paper. This exhibition will feature Transgressions II (2009), a multimedia installation from the Asia Society Museum Collection. This three-channel video integrates the folk sensibility of traditional shadow plays with new technology, creating a mesmerizing projection of colors and shadows. The exhibition will also feature a selection of Malani's artist books. This presentation will represent the artist's first solo museum exhibition in New York in over a decade.
WHY GO?  Discover non-European art in a special place on Park Avenue.

Two Exhibitions at the New York Historical Society
New York Historical Society

Bill Cunningham: Façades 
March 14, 2014 - June 15, 2014
In 1968, photographer Bill Cunningham embarked on an eight-year project to document the architectural riches and fashion history of New York City. Scouring the city’s thrift stores, auction houses, and street fairs for vintage clothing, and scouting sites on his bicycle, Cunningham generated a photographic essay entitled Façades, which paired models—in particular his muse, fellow photographer Editta Sherman—in period costumes with historic settings.
WHY GO?  Enjoy NYC landmarks in a unique way!

The Black Fives
March 14, 2014 - July 20, 2014
This exhibition covers the pioneering history of the African American basketball teams that existed in New York City and elsewhere from the early 1900s through 1950, the year the National Basketball Association became racially integrated. Just after the game of basketball was invented in 1891, teams were often called “fives” in reference to their five starting players. Teams made up entirely of African American players were referred to as “colored fives,” “Negro fives,” or black fives—the period became known as the Black Fives Era.
WHY GO?  Sports history doesn't usually get this kind of exhibition - it will be fascinating. 

Two Exhibitions at Schomburg Center in Harlem
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Funky Turns 40: Black Character Revolution
February 5 - June 14, 2014
From 1900 to 1960, Hollywood’s greatest animators and biggest studios produced more than 600 cartoon shorts featuring black characters. These films reflected the racial stereotypes of the pre–Civil Rights Era, portraying blacks as less than human and as minstrel caricatures. It wasn’t until the late 1960s and early 1970s that Saturday morning television cartoons featured black animated characters in a positive and realistic manner. Funky Turns 40, from the Museum of Uncut Funk, explores these black animated characters and the impact they had on a generation of young folk.
WHY GO?  Discover a whole generation of TV that started ti include African American characters!

Motown: The Truth Is A Hit
February 1 - July 26, 2014 Courtesy of the Motown MuseumMotown founder Berry Gordy is quoted as saying “The truth is a hit.” And in truth, Detroit’s Motown Records became the voice of an entire generation. Our upcoming Motown exhibition, The Truth Is a Hit seeks to explore Gordy’s notion of the truth by tracing black Music from its African roots through slavery, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, urban America, the Civil Rights and anti-war movements, up to the present day.
WHY GO?  Music history is always fun and this exhibition will be fascinating to discover singers and songwriters again or for the first time.

The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888
Museum of Chinese in America
October 23, 2013 - April 13, 2014
The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888 showcases Harold L. Lee and Sons, Inc., a cornerstone of Chinatown. Founded in 1888, this year marks the company’s 125th anniversary. MOCA will present a selection of photographs and artifacts from the business, tracing its rise from a small foreign exchange business to national insurance brokerage. The exhibition will take place in MOCA’s recreated general store: a space fashioned to represent an old New York storefront with tin ceilings, built-in wooden cabinets, and brick walls.
WHY GO?  What a special way to learn about how one family reflects a culture!

Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master Painter
February 27 - May 18, 2014
National Academy
By the turn of the 20th century, the success of Anders Zorn (1860-1920) rivaled that of the most famous artists of his day, including John Singer Sargent. A virtuoso watercolorist, bravura painter, and etcher, Zorn had risen from humble beginnings in the Swedish countryside to travel the world, captivate American artists and politicians alike, and paint some of the most sought after portraits of America’s Gilded Age. This major retrospective features more than 90 rarely seen works and brings to light the work of a master, long overlooked in America.
WHY GO?  Sargent is a master so to compare Zorn to Sargent means he is a BEAST!  Go see it!  It will be very traditional paintingbut it will also add much beauty to your life!

The Art of Video Games
Hudson River Museum - Yonkers 
February 15 - May 18, 2014
One of the first major exhibitions to explore the 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, The Art of Video Games focuses on the medium’s striking graphics, creative storytelling, and player interactivity.  The Art of Video Games features the most influential artists and designers across five eras of game development, from early pioneers to the contemporary artists, who created some of the best games for 20 gaming systems that range from the Atari VCS to PlayStation 3.
WHY GO?  Discover or re-discover the world of video games.  And EASY TO REACH from Grand Central Station!

Metro-North Hudson Line from Grand Central Terminal to Glenwood Station. Walk 1 block east on Glenwood Avenue; turn left onto Ravine Avenue . At the end of Ravine Avenue , turn left into Trevor Park. Follow path to museum entrance.  Make your visit a One-Day Getaway, and get a combined rail and admission discount ticket. Click here for details.