Dog Star / A Creative Arts Guide

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DOG STAR NYC IS A CREATIVE ARTS GUIDE | ART + THEATER + CHEAP DATES + POP CULTURE + FREE EVENTS + CITY LIVING + DESIGN + MUSIC + PHOTOGRAPHY + SPORTS + VIDEO + FILM + STREET LIFE + WRITING + POETRY & LOTS OF FUN + MAKE ART OUT OF YOUR LIFE!

Image above: Vik Muniz

A Bar at the Folies-Bergère after Édouard Manet, from the Pictures of Magazines 2 series, 2012.

Out of the refuse of modern life—torn scraps of outdated magazines, destined for obscurity—Muniz has assembled an ode to one of the first paintings of modern life. Édouard Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, painted in 1882, explores the treachery of nineteenth-century Parisian nightlife through the depiction of a bartender attending to a male patron reflected in the mirror behind her. Muniz plays on Manet’s style, replacing Manet’s visible brushstrokes with the frayed edges of torn paper and lending the work immense visual interest.

“Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there. ” - Stacy L.

EMAIL: dogstarcontact@gmail.com

DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

IMPORTANT NOTICE OF NON COMMERCIAL & EDUCATIONAL CONTENT Unless otherwise stated, we do not own copyrights to any of the visual or audio content that might be included on this blog. Dog Star is for criticism, commentary, reporting and educational purposes under the FAIR USE ACT: Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. If you own the copyright to any images and object to them being included in this blog, please advise and the content will be removed. No attempt is made for material gain from this blog's content.

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Goodbye 2013...Hello 2014

Wisdom from George Carlin


George Carlin's wife died early in 2008 and George followed her, dying in July 2008. It is ironic George Carlin - comedian of the 70's and 80's - could write something so very eloquent and so very appropriate. An observation by George Carlin:

The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellness.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom. A time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete.

Remember to spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to be around forever.

Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that little person soon will grow up and leave your side.

Remember, to give a warm hug to the one next to you, because that is the only treasure you can give with your heart and it doesn't cost a cent.

Remember, to say, 'I love you' to your partner and your loved ones, but most of all mean it. A kiss and an embrace will mend hurt when it comes from deep inside of you.

Remember to hold hands and cherish the moment for someday that person will not be there again.

Give time to love, give time to speak! And give time to share the precious thoughts in your mind.

And always remember, life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by those moments that take our breath away.

George Carlin

Meet Lady Pink

Lady Pink, graffiti & fine artist

Sandra Fabara, known as the “first lady of graffiti,” was the only girl in the burgeoning subway-bombing graffiti subculture of 1980–85, when her teenage work, under the name Lady Pink, could be seen throughout the city. Simultaneously, she was exhibiting with street artists such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, meeting Andy Warhol and collaborating with fine artist Jenny Holzer, which helped her transition to creating art legally — now in collections nationally, internationally and at the Metropolitan, Whitney and Brooklyn museums in New York City. 

She credits her public school teachers with encouraging her talent and modeling the life of a working artist. “I had all kinds of wonderful teachers who influenced me. They would tell me there is a lot of promise in me, despite my acting out and getting in trouble. I never quite believed them, but they saw potential in me, and it takes a lifetime to realize what they’re telling you as a kid,” Fabara says. 

She is now returning that favor as a mentor herself, teaching public mural making in an after-school program at Frank Sinatra HS in Astoria.


I’m a first-generation immigrant. I came to this country from Ecuador as a 7-year-old in 1972 with my mom and sister. We started in Catholic school and encountered racism, so my mom pulled us out and put us in PS 17 in Williamsburg and JHS 126 in Greenpoint. There were other Latin kids there so we fit in a lot better in public school for sure.

One of my earliest school memories is of my art teacher in junior high school, Mr. Robbins. He was a little sparrow of a man, already elderly and skinny, with big glasses. He was very kind and encouraged me a lot in my art. He sold one of my repeating designs to a textile company for $100, which was cool at that young age, and he encouraged me to build a portfolio for high school. He was proud when I got into the HS for Art & Design.

I encourage any kid to go to a vocational high school. It gives you a huge edge in the world. Most of these teachers are working professionals. One teacher, Mr. Graves, was instrumental in asking me to curate an art exhibit at Art & Design. He was an elderly black man with glasses and was in charge of the school’s gallery. He believed in us, and I, at the age of 16, was allowed to choose a dozen artists and curate an exhibit of graffiti art. We had a really awesome exhibit!

There were about 300 graffiti writers going to that school when I started and that’s where I met kids from every corner of New York City, neighborhoods I had never even heard of.

We had the most popular table in the lunchroom, and I was queen of the lot. That’s where we planned and did all our business. We all became apprentices and masters — we taught each other. That school was instrumental in nurturing the artists that came out of there, and there are just a massive number of artists, working professionals from there.

The networking and the kind of friendships we made there are equivalent to the sororities and fraternities from universities. We’ve stayed friends.

I learned how to exhibit, how to get press ... It’s not the conventional way of education, but that’s what happened. Although I always did well in school, in high school I went over to the dark side and by my senior year, I barely ever went to class. I didn’t end up graduating. Later on, I went for my GED and nailed it with high grades.

My major in high school was architecture, but I found the mathematics dreadfully boring, lots of straight lines and rules. It’s difficult to sit still and focus on such tedious work when you’re young and want to run around and throw color all over the city. I couldn’t get into it, but the drafting helps me as a professional muralist; understanding the elevations and measurements helps me considerably.

I work with a wonderful teacher now at Frank Sinatra HS, Dr. Jane Kahn. She is inspirational and dedicated. I told her that I come with my own grant to teach painting and mural making to the kids. I like to put these kids into the spotlight, give them huge projects and responsibilities, like they did with me when I was young.

I’ve been doing the after-school program with them for 10 years now. I try to tell the kids I’m working with — and they may not believe me just yet — that they will be amazing when they grow up.

— As told to reporter Cara Metz

It's Called the World WIDE Web for a Reason!

Dog Star recently talked to my 11th graders about where they get their news.  I asked, "What websites do you visit regularly for news, culture and politics?" Blank stares. I told the class, "Consider adding some sites to your digital diet that are going to make you smarter and more informed." 

So I put out this call to FB: What sites do YOU recommend? I will compile them for a blog post to get them started. I am looking for what's alternative, mainstream and all political views. I find that many teens are fairly conservative (reflecting their family's values) while only a 1/3 would be what I call LIBERAL.

Rather than label each site we'd like devoted and new readers will click on the links and discover what they're about.

Huffington Post

Loop21

Utne Reader

The Atlantic

The Advocate

The Grio

The Onion

The Drudge Report

DNAinfo

Buzzflash

Gothamist

The Nation

Mother Jones

National Review

The New Republic

BBC

The Guardian

Monday, December 30, 2013

Cartoonist Art Spiegelman gives a tour of his retrospective show at the Jewish Museum

A Look at a Painter's Own Work After Finding Out He Painted Famous Frauds

What Puts Soul in a Masterpiece?


Recently, The Art Newspaper reported that Pei-Shen Qian had some of his paintings included in a group exhibition in a Shanghai gallery last spring. Scandal-following readers will recognize the name as that of a Chinese artist, once living in Queens, whose imitations of paintings by Pollock, de Kooning and other Abstract Expressionists were sold as real for millions of dollars by the New York gallery Knoedler & Company, now defunct. 

In China, where he regularly returned for extended visits after moving to New York in 1981, Mr. Pei-Shen, 73, is known for his own paintings. He first emerged as an artist in the late 1970s, one of a group producing and exhibiting abstract work, which Cultural Revolution authorities deemed bourgeois and decadent. In 2006, he had a 25-year retrospective at the BB Gallery in Shanghai. Some of his works are posted on various websites. Naturally, you wonder, are Mr. Pei-Shen’s own paintings any good? Would I like to review them, my editor asked? 

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE AT THE NEW YORK TIMES

Former NFL Player Now Acts in Shakespeare's Plays

The Starting Lineup: As Othello, a 6-Foot-3 Running Back, No. 27, Eddie George

Eddie George on the field for the Tennessee Titans in 2003. 
 
Elsa/Getty Images Eddie George on the field for the Tennessee Titans in 2003.
 
 
When Eddie George retired from football in 2005, after nine years as an NFL running back, he was 32 years old and had racked up some enviable statistics: 130 consecutive regular-season game starts, 10,441 rushing yards and 68 touchdowns, along with the Heisman Trophy he won at Ohio State University in 1995. Since then, he has started a string of businesses, including fitness programs and a landscape architecture company, opened a sports-themed restaurant and been a motivational speaker.

But Mr. George may also hold a record for which there does not appear to be much competition: former NFL players who have performed Shakespeare professionally. (That doesn’t count the halfback for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, in the 1930s, whose name happened to be William Shakespeare.)  Having already made his debut as a Shakespearean actor playing the title role in the Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s production of “Julius Caesar” in 2012, Mr. George is returning to the festival for a second, heftier Shakespeare role: the title role in “Othello.” The production runs from Jan. 9 to Feb. 2. (Mr. George will take a break from Jan. 17 to 24, when Byron Brooks will take his place).

In an interview with The Tennessean, Mr. George said he found a way to relate the role to his own life, noting that Othello was a military commander without a war to fight, just as he was a football player who was no longer on a team.

“It’s very much about that transition,” he told the paper, “about the psychological standpoint of how it affects you. How that energy matures and evolves, and takes on a life of its own.”

JibJab 2013 Year in Review: "What A Year!"

OPEN NOW! GO SEE Wangechi Mutu's Wild World @ the Brooklyn Museum


ARTWORK ABOVE:  The Bride Who Married a Camel's Head, 2009. Mixed-media collage on Mylar, 42 x 30 in. (106.7 x 76.2 cm). Wangechi Mutu (Kenyan, b. 1972). 


Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey

October 11, 2013–March 9, 2014

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey is the first survey in the United States of this internationally renowned, Brooklyn-based artist. Spanning from the mid-1990s to the present, the exhibition unites more than fifty pieces, including Mutu’s signature large-scale collages as well as video works, never-before-seen sketchbook drawings, a site-specific wall drawing, and sculptural installations. Born in Nairobi, Kenya, Mutu scrutinizes globalization by combining found materials, magazine cutouts, sculpture, and painted imagery. Sampling such diverse sources as African traditions, international politics, the fashion industry, pornography, and science fiction, her work explores gender, race, war, colonialism, global consumption, and the exoticization of the black female body. Mutu is best known for spectacular and provocative collages depicting female figures—part human, animal, plant, and machine—in fantastical landscapes that are simultaneously unnerving and alluring, defying easy categorization and identification. Bringing her interconnected ecosystems to life for this exhibition through sculptural installations and videos, Mutu encourages audiences to consider these mythical worlds as places for cultural, psychological, and socio-political exploration and transformation.

FREE! New City Park Honors F.D.R. & His Famous Speech "Four Freedoms"


Dog Star admires F.D.R. and knows he is an important man during the Great Depression and at the start of World War II.  He is also the former governor of New York State.  His family's estate north of New York City - Hyde Park - is open to the public and a great way to spend a Summer or Autumn Saturday with your family.  Of course, F.D.R.'s wife - Eleanor Roosevelt - is also an important figure and she had a huge role in drafting the Universal Human Rights delivered at the United Nations.



It's been 40 years since New York has been planning a memorial park for 32nd President Franklin D. Roosevelt on the east end of Roosevelt island. Originally designed by Louis Kahn in 1974, New York's almost bankrupt economy put the project on hold until the release of the documentary "My Architect" when enough support was fostered to fund the completion of the project carried out by local firm Mitchell Giurgola Architects.  


The triangular site of the 'FDR Four Freedoms Park' funnels visitors along a white granite plinth lined in linden trees to an open-air courtyard, at the entrance to which is thick block with a 28-inch bronze bust of FDR's head, sculpted by Jo Davidson, facing the united nations headquarters only 300 meters away. On the backside, the four freedoms speech is engraved as a symbol of the president's legacy to the building blocks of contemporary democratic principles. The project is planned to expand in the future, transforming a 19th-century small pox hospital to an auxiliary visitor center. The park is now open to the public.


Read more about F.D.R. here.

Go here for directions to the Four Freedoms Park!



The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park is an enduring tribute to the life and work of President Roosevelt. In the late 1960s, during a period of national urban renewal, New York City Mayor John Lindsay proposed to reinvent Roosevelt Island (then called Welfare Island) into a vibrant, residential community. The New York Times championed renaming the island for President Franklin D. Roosevelt and constructing a memorial to him, remarking: "It has long seemed to us that an ideal place for a memorial to FDR would be on Welfare Island, which...could be easily renamed in his honor... It would face the sea he loved, the Atlantic he bridged, the Europe he helped to save, the United Nations he inspired."



FDR's Famous Speech on The Four Freedoms On January 6, 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered a speech that shaped this nation, now known as the Four Freedoms speech. He looked forward to a world founded on four human freedoms: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.  Today, by building Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, we have the opportunity to honor this man and these essential freedoms.




Sunday, December 29, 2013

New Year! New Art! Must-See Museum Shows of 2014

Dog Star knows everyone gets a little LESS busy as soon as the new year begins.  Maybe you'll make time to see one of these museum exhibitions?

It's a new year for new art!

This can be your guide to exhibitions at NYC's museums this Winter/Spring 2014 and a checklist to be sure you see the ones you want before they close.

THIS IS A PRINTER-FRIENDLY POST.  All text in black to make it easy to print the list and keep it in your agenda or to refer to it and make dates to see these exhibitions with family and friends.

All of the museums have a free or pay-what-you-wish (it can be just $1) night so be sure to check the website - it is linked in BOLD in the name of the museum.

You may read about artists here that you've never heard of before - that's a good reason to check it out.  Read the list and make a plan to see at least three to start - pick one you are excited about seeing and invite your family.  

Choose another one and invite two friends to join you!  

On the third go by yourself - it will be an entirely different experience and you be doing less socializing, less talking, less talking ABOUT the art and MORE LOOKING. 

And always keep your phone in your pocket.  It's tough to make a real connection to the artwork if you are texting, taking pictures or researching.  

Give yourself the chance to have a "phone-free" experience with art.

Finally, we've added one line called WHY GO? to express in a few words what's special, unusual or a rare opportunity to encourage devoted Dog Star readers to see an exhibition.

CLOSING SOON!
The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution
New York Historical Society
October 11, 2013 - February 23, 2014
Works by Duchamp, Matisse, Picasso, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh will be on display in The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution, which revisits the famous 1913 New York Armory Show on its 100th anniversary.
WHY GO?  One hundred years ago the Armory Show was shocking to many Americans - find out why and discover how much our society has changed and not changed since then!

CLOSING SOON!
Art Spiegelman's Co-Mix: A Retrospective
The Jewish Museum
November 8, 2013 - March 23, 2014
This first U.S. retrospective celebrates the career of one of the most influential living comic artists. The exhibition spans Spiegelman’s career from his early days in underground comix to provocative New Yorker covers and artistic collaborations in new media. Included are over three hundred preparatory sketches, preliminary and final drawings, plus prints and other ephemeral and documentary material.
WHY GO?  Devoted Dog Star readers will discover a wider world of this artist's work beyond his graphic novels Maus I and Maus II.  Do not miss this exhibition!

CLOSING SOON!
Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey
Brooklyn Museum
October 11, 2013–March 9, 2014
Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey is the first survey in the United States of this internationally renowned, Brooklyn-based artist. Spanning from the mid-1990s to the present, the exhibition unites more than fifty pieces, including Mutu’s signature large-scale collages as well as video works, never-before-seen sketchbook drawings, a site-specific wall drawing, and sculptural installations.
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION - You have never seen anything like this artists work and it will be an eye-opening and fresh experience!

CLOSING SOON!
WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY:
Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath
Brooklyn Museum
November 8, 2013–February 2, 2014
WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath explores the experience of war with an unprecedented collection of 400 photographic prints, books, magazines, albums, and camera equipment, bringing together iconic and unknown images taken by members of the military, commercial portraitists, journalists, amateurs, artists, and numerous Pulitzer Prize–winning photographers.
WHY GO?  Fans of photography and photographers will enjoy this historical look at war photos through the years - including more recent conflicts.

CLOSING SOON!
The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier:
From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk
Brooklyn Museum
October 25, 2013–February 23, 2014
The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, the first international exhibition dedicated to the groundbreaking French couturier. Playful, poetic, and transformative, Gaultier’s superbly crafted and detailed garments are inspired by the beauty and diversity of global cultures.
WHY GO?  Fans of fashion and fashionistas will want to see an extraordinary designer's career in one place - exciting and inspiring!

CLOSING SOON!
Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Lost Performance and the New Psychodrama - Manhattan
Whitney Museum of American Art
October 31, 2013-March 2014
This exhibition illuminates a radical period of 1970s performance art that flourished in downtown Manhattan, or what filmmaker and performance artist Jack Smith called “Rented Island,” and still remains largely unknown today. Working in lofts, storefronts, and alternative spaces, this group of artists, with backgrounds in theater, dance, music, and visual art, created complex new forms of performance to embody and address contemporary media, commercial culture, and high art.
WHY GO?  This exhibition will try to give a sense of the downtown performance scene in SoHo and the East Village in the 1970s - definitely for anybody who finds this time period and type of performance-based art fascinating.  This will be an eye-opening exhibition with installations, video and performance.

CLOSING SOON! 
The Shadows Took Shape
Studio Museum of Harlem 
Nov 14, 2013 - Mar 9, 2014
The Shadows Took Shape a dynamic interdisciplinary exhibition exploring contemporary art through the lens of Afrofuturist aesthetics. Coined in 1994 by writer Mark Dery in his essay “Black to the Future,” the term “Afrofuturism” refers to a creative and intellectual genre that emerged as a strategy to explore science fiction, fantasy, magical realism and pan-Africanism. With roots in the avant-garde musical stylings of sonic innovator Sun Ra (born Herman Poole Blount, 1914–1993), Afrofuturism has been used by artists, writers and theorists as a way to prophesize the future, redefine the present and reconceptualize the past. The Shadows Took Shape will be one of the few major museum exhibitions to explore the ways in which this form of creative expression has been adopted internationally and highlight the range of work made over the past twenty-five years.
WHY GO?  Discover artists who do bold, original and innovative work! 

Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China
Metropolitan Museum of Art
December 11, 2013–April 6, 2014
Featuring some seventy works by thirty-five artists in various media—paintings, calligraphy, photographs, woodblock prints, video, and sculpture—created during the past three decades, the exhibition is organized thematically into four parts: The Written Word, New Landscapes, Abstraction, and Beyond the Brush. Although all of the artists have challenged, subverted, or otherwise transformed their sources through new modes of expression, Ink Art seeks to demonstrate that China's ancient pattern of seeking cultural renewal through the reinterpretation of past models remains a viable creative path.
WHY GO?  Bust the stereotypes you may have of China and Chinese culture and discover another side to this diverse and creative place.

William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time
Metropolitan Museum of Art
October 22, 2013–May 11, 2014
At the center of the installation is a moving sculpture—the "breathing machine" or "elephant"—an organ-like automaton with a pumping bellows. Plans from the 1870s for copper pneumatic tubes under the streets of Paris that would pump regular bursts of air to calibrate the city's clocks reminded Kentridge of a passage from Charles Dickens's novel Hard Times (1854). Dickens describes a factory machine moving "monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness"—a metaphor for the often convulsive developments in science and industry during the modern era and a reminder of the vain impulse to control time.
WHY GO?  You have never seen anything like this exhibition - it will inspire you!

The Little Prince: A New York Story
The Morgan Library & Museum
January 24 - April 27, 2014
This exhibition of the original manuscript and watercolor drawings—the most comprehensive ever mounted—explores the American origins of a story that reminds us that what matters most can only be seen with the heart.
WHY GO?  Anybody who knows the famous story or wants to discover a classic will want to see this wonderful little show.

A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play
The Morgan Library & Museum
February 14 through May 18, 2014
A Collective Invention: Photographs at Play signals the debut of photography as a curatorial focus at the Morgan. With over eighty works from more than two dozen collections arranged into a surprising chain of visual associations, the exhibition explores the many ways of interpreting a photograph and pays tribute to the unique role played by the creative collector. Each photograph in the exhibition's "collective invention" shares a visual or conceptual quality with the piece to its left, another with the one to its right. Embodying photography's rich history and wide range of applications in science, art, propaganda, journalism, and self-promotion, A Collective Invention celebrates a medium that mirrors the energy and complexity of modern life.
WHY GO?  Since the Morgan began as one man's collection and photography wasn't part of it originally, the curators have decided to use this as an advantage rather see it as a disadvantage.  It will be fun and engaging to see how these images "talk to each other."

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties 
Brooklyn Museum 
March 7–July 6, 2014
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties offers a focused look at painting, sculpture, graphics, and photography from a decade defined by social protest and American race relations. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this exhibition considers how sixty-six of the decade’s artists, including African Americans and some of their white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and Caribbean contemporaries, used wide-ranging aesthetic approaches to address the struggle for racial justice.
WHY GO?  An amazing opportunity to engage with a time period of American history and culture that is so misunderstood!

City as Canvas
Museum of the City of New York
February 4 - August 24, 2014
Martin Wong (1946–1999), an East Village artist and visionary collector of graffiti art, amassed a collection of hundreds of works on paper and canvas just as street art was becoming a worldwide cultural phenomenon in the 1980s. Wong’s archive is a unique treasure that provides a window into a vibrant subculture and documents the process of young outlaws becoming mature artists. City as Canvas: Graffiti Art from the Martin Wong Collection highlights works in aerosol, ink, and other mediums by seminal figures in the movement, including Keith Haring, Lee Quiñones, Lady Pink, and Futura 2000, as well as photographs that capture work long since erased from walls and subways. Wong donated his collection to the City Museum in 1994.
WHY GO?  See original work by truly original NYC artists from an exciting time in the city.

Two Exhibitions at International Center of Photography (ICP)
International Center of Photography (ICP)
Both have same exhibition dates January 31–May 4, 2014

Capa in Color 

This exhibition presents Robert Capa’s color work for the first time. Capa regularly used color film from the 1940s until his death in 1954. Some of these photographs were published in magazines of the day, but the majority have never been printed, seen, or even studied. Over the years, this aspect of Capa’s career has virtually been forgotten. With over 100 contemporary color prints by the famous photojournalist, Capa in Color presents this work an integral part of his post-war career and fundamental in remaining relevant to magazines.
WHY GO?  Add a special show to your photography education and discover Capa!

What Is a Photograph?
Organized by ICP Curator Carol Squiers, What Is a Photograph? will explore the intense creative experimentation in photography that has occurred since the 1970s. Conceptual art introduced photography into contemporary art making, using the medium in ways that challenged it artistically, intellectually, and technically and broadened the notion of what a photograph could be in art. A new generation of artists began an equally rigorous but more aesthetically adventurous analysis, which probed photography itself—from the role of light, color, composition, to materiality and the subject. What Is a Photograph? brings together these artists, who reinvented photography.
WHY GO?  Discover artists who do bold, original and innovative work! 


“For Forgetting,” Laure Provoust
New Museum
February 12 – April 13, 2014
The non-linear narratives of Turner prize winner Laure Prouvost’s films often  create moving experiences through startling manipulations of sound and imagery. For her first solo museum presentation in the U.S., the artist will show a new work in the Lobby Gallery of the New Museum, “For Forgetting,” an immersive multichannel video installation that explores “slippages in memory and arbitrary distinctions of power and possession.” While her work “Wantee” was the sleeper hit of the 2013 Turner Exhibition, this new installation will likely come much higher expectations.
WHY GO?  It's fresh and engaging and it will be totally new for you!

The 2014 Whitney Biennial
Whitney Museum of American Art
March 7 – May 25, 2014
The last Biennial to take place at the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer-designed home at 975 Madison Avenue will feature works and projects by 103 artists and collectives, and will be shaped by three curators not affiliated with the Museum.  This Biennial will have more artist collectives than ever before, and will include performances throughout the building, along with sound pieces and a contemporary opera. There will be much experimentation across disciplines — writers painting, filmmakers creating sculpture, drawings by photographers — and projects by new media ventures like Triple Canopy. And some of the exhibition will extend beyond the walls of the museum, like artist Tony Tasset’s outdoor sculpture, to be shown in Hudson River Park.
WHY GO?  Such a giant exhibition will have many, many surprises - some bad but mostly good!

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
The Guggenheim Museum
January 24 – May 14
Over the last thirty years, Carrie Mae Weems has been created a diverse and affecting body of work — beginning with documentary photography and broadening out into a range of mediums including text, audio, digital imagery, fabric, installation, and video — in an ongoing exploration of class, race, sexism, politics, and gender. This show, the first comprehensive retrospective for the artist (which kicked off in January at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nahville), will present more than 200 works, with a focus on photography and video. It will include some of Weems’s earliest documentary series, like a group of as-of-yet unpublished images inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Roy DeCarava, as well as her well-known 1990 set “The Kitchen Table Series.”
WHY GO?  A hugely talented artist who deserves more attention for her work!

Maria Lassnig
MoMA PS1
Opens March 9
Fresh from her lifetime achievement award at the 2013 Venice Biennale, nonagenarian German painter Maria Lassnig will be the subject of this 50-painting survey focused on her sustained practice of metaphysical self-portraiture. Lassnig's dark and playful renderings of her own body, made up of loose brushstrokes in soft greens, reds, pinks, and blues against stark white backdrops, are often ominously distorted or accompanied by strange, symbolic accessories, from a dancing skeleton to a hamster.
WHY GO?  Go see what she's about and discover her world!

Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937
Neue Galerie
March 13 – June 30
The Neue Galerie is putting on an exhibition of works that were originally part of Adolf Hitler’s infamous 1937 exhibition of modern art, which presented paintings and sculptures condemned as degenerate by the Nazi party. The new show, curated by scholar and Neue Galerie board member Dr. Olaf Peters, will be the first large-scale take on this subject in the U.S. since the highly regarded 1991 show “Degenerate Art: The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. At the Neue Galerie, the so-called degenerate art will be presented alongside officially sanctioned art of the period.
WHY GO?  A unique way to view history - through an art show the Nazis presented that was actually more popular with the public that the "acceptable art" show!

Zhang Huan
Storm King
Opens May 3
The starting point for this exhibition — organized by Storm King director David R. Collens and the Asia Society’s museum director, Melissa Chiu — is the Chinese contemporary artist Zhang Huan’s “Three-Legged Buddha” (2007). Weighing over 12 tons, this gargantuan copper and steel sculpture, which Storm King acquired in 2010, will be the centerpiece of a display of outdoor sculptures similarly inspired by the subject of the Buddha — Zhang is a Ju Shi Buddhist. Other works will fill the rooms of the Museum Building.  The works in this show, mostly created since 2005, were inspired by Zhang’s travels through Tibet, where he viewed remnants of Buddhist statuary destroyed during the Cultural Revolution.
WHY GO?  A special sculptor in a very special setting!

Other Primary Structures
The Jewish Museum
March 14 – August 3
Revisiting the Jewish Museum’s 1966 show “Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors” — a watershed exhibition that brought artists like Carl Andre, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt their first major attention — this show will revisit that cultural moment however from a far more global perspective. The first exhibition at the museum curated by its deputy director, Jens Hoffmann, it will include artists from Latin America, Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Exploring the legacy of the mostly American and British abstract sculptors in the first show, the new show will examine their influence on artists who worked at the same time in other countries, whose work has been little known or seen in the US.
WHY GO?  Opens up the idea of who is a "Jewish artist" by including many who work outside the United States.

Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New
Museum of Modern Art
December 21, 2013–April 21, 2014
During a career spanning half a century, Ileana Sonnabend (1914–2007) helped shape the course of postwar art in Europe and North America. A gallerist and noted collector, Sonnabend discovered and championed many of the most significant artists of her time. Among the important works she owned is Robert Rauschenberg's Combine Canyon (1959), which the Sonnabend family donated to The Museum of Modern Art in 2012. In celebration of this extraordinary gift, Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New explores Sonnabend’s legendary eye through selected works of art that she presented in her eponymous galleries in Paris and New York.
WHY GO?  Celebrates a woman who had a big influence on how we see art from the 1960s through the 1980s because her gallery influenced what collectors bought and what museums put on display.

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal
Museum of Modern Art
February 1–June 1, 2014
Through an initial selection of drawings, films, and large-scale architectural models, the exhibition examines the tension in Wright’s thinking about the growing American city in the 1920s and 1930s, when he worked simultaneously on radical new forms for the skyscraper and on a comprehensive plan for the urbanization of the American landscape titled “Broadacre City.” Visitors encounter the spectacular 12-foot-by-12-foot model of this plan, which merges one of the earliest schemes for a highway flyover with an expansive, agrarian domain. Promoted and updated throughout Wright’s life, the model toured the country for several years in the 1930s, beginning with a display at Rockefeller Center. This dispersed vision is paired with Wright's innovative structural experiments for building the vertical city.
WHY GO?  We need to better understand how to plan city living for the future - and Wright helps us do that by showing alternatives.

Nalini Malani: Transgressions
Asia Society 
February 19, 2014 - August 3, 2014
Nalini Malani (b. 1946 in Karachi, Pakistan; lives and works in Mumbai, India) is one of the foremost contemporary women artists from India. Her practice utilizes allegory and symbolism as metaphors to explore issues relating to gender, class, and race in a post-colonial world. Formally, her work spans the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and works on paper. This exhibition will feature Transgressions II (2009), a multimedia installation from the Asia Society Museum Collection. This three-channel video integrates the folk sensibility of traditional shadow plays with new technology, creating a mesmerizing projection of colors and shadows. The exhibition will also feature a selection of Malani's artist books. This presentation will represent the artist's first solo museum exhibition in New York in over a decade.
WHY GO?  Discover non-European art in a special place on Park Avenue.

Two Exhibitions at the New York Historical Society
New York Historical Society

Bill Cunningham: Façades 
March 14, 2014 - June 15, 2014
In 1968, photographer Bill Cunningham embarked on an eight-year project to document the architectural riches and fashion history of New York City. Scouring the city’s thrift stores, auction houses, and street fairs for vintage clothing, and scouting sites on his bicycle, Cunningham generated a photographic essay entitled Façades, which paired models—in particular his muse, fellow photographer Editta Sherman—in period costumes with historic settings.
WHY GO?  Enjoy NYC landmarks in a unique way!

The Black Fives
March 14, 2014 - July 20, 2014
This exhibition covers the pioneering history of the African American basketball teams that existed in New York City and elsewhere from the early 1900s through 1950, the year the National Basketball Association became racially integrated. Just after the game of basketball was invented in 1891, teams were often called “fives” in reference to their five starting players. Teams made up entirely of African American players were referred to as “colored fives,” “Negro fives,” or black fives—the period became known as the Black Fives Era.
WHY GO?  Sports history doesn't usually get this kind of exhibition - it will be fascinating. 

Two Exhibitions at Schomburg Center in Harlem
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Funky Turns 40: Black Character Revolution
February 5 - June 14, 2014
From 1900 to 1960, Hollywood’s greatest animators and biggest studios produced more than 600 cartoon shorts featuring black characters. These films reflected the racial stereotypes of the pre–Civil Rights Era, portraying blacks as less than human and as minstrel caricatures. It wasn’t until the late 1960s and early 1970s that Saturday morning television cartoons featured black animated characters in a positive and realistic manner. Funky Turns 40, from the Museum of Uncut Funk, explores these black animated characters and the impact they had on a generation of young folk.
WHY GO?  Discover a whole generation of TV that started ti include African American characters!

Motown: The Truth Is A Hit
February 1 - July 26, 2014 Courtesy of the Motown MuseumMotown founder Berry Gordy is quoted as saying “The truth is a hit.” And in truth, Detroit’s Motown Records became the voice of an entire generation. Our upcoming Motown exhibition, The Truth Is a Hit seeks to explore Gordy’s notion of the truth by tracing black Music from its African roots through slavery, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, urban America, the Civil Rights and anti-war movements, up to the present day.
WHY GO?  Music history is always fun and this exhibition will be fascinating to discover singers and songwriters again or for the first time.

The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888
Museum of Chinese in America
October 23, 2013 - April 13, 2014
The Lee Family of New York Chinatown Since 1888 showcases Harold L. Lee and Sons, Inc., a cornerstone of Chinatown. Founded in 1888, this year marks the company’s 125th anniversary. MOCA will present a selection of photographs and artifacts from the business, tracing its rise from a small foreign exchange business to national insurance brokerage. The exhibition will take place in MOCA’s recreated general store: a space fashioned to represent an old New York storefront with tin ceilings, built-in wooden cabinets, and brick walls.
WHY GO?  What a special way to learn about how one family reflects a culture!

Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master Painter
February 27 - May 18, 2014
National Academy
By the turn of the 20th century, the success of Anders Zorn (1860-1920) rivaled that of the most famous artists of his day, including John Singer Sargent. A virtuoso watercolorist, bravura painter, and etcher, Zorn had risen from humble beginnings in the Swedish countryside to travel the world, captivate American artists and politicians alike, and paint some of the most sought after portraits of America’s Gilded Age. This major retrospective features more than 90 rarely seen works and brings to light the work of a master, long overlooked in America.
WHY GO?  Sargent is a master so to compare Zorn to Sargent means he is a BEAST!  Go see it!  It will be very traditional paintingbut it will also add much beauty to your life!

The Art of Video Games
Hudson River Museum - Yonkers 
February 15 - May 18, 2014
One of the first major exhibitions to explore the 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, The Art of Video Games focuses on the medium’s striking graphics, creative storytelling, and player interactivity.  The Art of Video Games features the most influential artists and designers across five eras of game development, from early pioneers to the contemporary artists, who created some of the best games for 20 gaming systems that range from the Atari VCS to PlayStation 3.
WHY GO?  Discover or re-discover the world of video games.  And EASY TO REACH from Grand Central Station!

Metro-North Hudson Line from Grand Central Terminal to Glenwood Station. Walk 1 block east on Glenwood Avenue; turn left onto Ravine Avenue . At the end of Ravine Avenue , turn left into Trevor Park. Follow path to museum entrance.  Make your visit a One-Day Getaway, and get a combined rail and admission discount ticket. Click here for details.


Canzone - A Poem by W.H. Auden

W.H. Auden

Canzone


When shall we learn, what should be clear as day,
We cannot choose what we are free to love?
Although the mouse we banished yesterday
Is an enraged rhinoceros today,
Our value is more threatened than we know:
Shabby objections to our present day
Go snooping round its outskirts; night and day
Faces, orations, battles, bait our will
As questionable forms and noises will;
Whole phyla of resentments every day
Give status to the wild men of the world
Who rule the absent-minded and this world.

We are created from and with the world
To suffer with and from it day by day:
Whether we meet in a majestic world
Of solid measurements or a dream world
Of swans and gold, we are required to love
All homeless objects that require a world.
Our claim to own our bodies and our world
Is our catastrophe. What can we know
But panic and caprice until we know
Our dreadful appetite demands a world
Whose order, origin, and purpose will
Be fluent satisfaction of our will?

Drift, Autumn, drift; fall, colours, where you will:
Bald melancholia minces through the world.
Regret, cold oceans, the lymphatic will
Caught in reflection on the right to will:
While violent dogs excite their dying day
To bacchic fury; snarl, though, as they will,
Their teeth are not a triumph for the will
But utter hesitation. What we love
Ourselves for is our power not to love,
To shrink to nothing or explode at will,
To ruin and remember that we know
What ruins and hyaenas cannot know.

If in this dark now I less often know
That spiral staircase where the haunted will
Hunts for its stolen luggage, who should know
Better than you, beloved, how I know
What gives security to any world.
Or in whose mirror I begin to know
The chaos of the heart as merchants know
Their coins and cities, genius its own day?
For through our lively traffic all the day,
In my own person I am forced to know
How much must be forgotten out of love,
How much must be forgiven, even love.

Dear flesh, dear mind, dear spirit, O dear love,
In the depths of myself blind monsters know
Your presence and are angry, dreading Love
That asks its image for more than love;
The hot rampageous horses of my will,
Catching the scent of Heaven, whinny: Love
Gives no excuse to evil done for love,
Neither in you, nor me, nor armies, nor the world
Of words and wheels, nor any other world.
Dear fellow-creature, praise our God of Love
That we are so admonished, that no day
Of conscious trial be a wasted day.

Or else we make a scarecrow of the day,
Loose ends and jumble of our common world,
And stuff and nonsense of our own free will;
Or else our changing flesh may never know
There must be sorrow if there can be love.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"Nature is a haunted house but art is a house that tries to be haunted." — Emily Dickinson

Imaginary Dog Star Soundtrack: HAND IN GLOVE by The Smiths



Dog Star is a HUGE fan of British '80s mega group The Smiths.  Find out more here.

Lyrics:

Hand in glove
The sun shines out of our behinds
No, it's not like any other love
This one is different - because it's us

Hand in glove
We can go wherever we please
And everything depends upon
How near you stand to me

And if the people stare
Then the people stare
Oh, I really don't know and I really don't care

There's no shame, ohhh no...
Ohhh no...

Hand in glove
The Good People laugh
Yes, we may be hidden by rags
But we've something they'll never have

Hand in glove
The sun shines out of our behinds
Yes, we may be hidden by rags
But we've something they'll never have

And if the people stare
Then the people stare
Oh, I really don't know and I really don't care

There's no shame, ohhh no...
Ohhh no...

So, hand in glove I stake my claim
I'll fight to the last breath

If they dare touch a hair on your head
I'll fight to the last breath

For the Good Life is out there somewhere
So stay on my arm, you little charmer

But I know my luck too well
Yes, I know my luck too well
And I'll probably never see you again
I'll probably never see you again
I'll probably never see you again


Saturday, December 28, 2013

QUOTE OF THE DAY

"There are books so alive that you’re always afraid that while you weren’t reading, the book has gone and changed, has shifted like a river; while you went on living, it went on living too, and like a river moved on and moved away. No one has stepped twice into the same river. But did anyone ever step twice into the same book?"
— Marina Tsvetaeva, Pushkin and Pugachev (1937)

21 Quest - Seat So Clean Trailer (Prod. by Ken-I-Produce)

The 39 Worst Words, Phrases, and Parts of Speech of 2013

The 39 Worst Words, Phrases, and Parts of Speech of 2013

  • ”#.” R.I.P., early Twitter feature. We’ll bury you next to your friend, the FourSquare check-in.
  • adverbs. Ban all adverbs. They’re mostly just gulp words, really.
  • "all the things."
  • "because [noun]": (i.e. “because science.”)
  • brogurt.” No.
  • classy.
  • "controversial tweet." There’s just no way to make this sound dignified, and besides, it leads to think pieces.
  • "cronut."
  • "crowdsourced."
  • "derp." It’s been an emotional ride, but it’s time to send this one off on the ice floe.
  • "disrupt." Luxury car apps aren’t disruptive.
  • "Donald Trump is considering a run for…" No, he’s not. He just isn’t. And if you’d like to get him unearned publicity, you should at least get some stock options out of it.
  • "doubled down." Unless the candidate did it while biting into a delicious sandwich, let’s just say the candidate “reaffirmed his/her position” on transportation funding or burrito drones or whatever we’ll be discussing in 2014.
  • "…favorited a tweet you were mentioned in." No one has ever wanted to know this.
  • "gaffe.” It’s going to be a long-enough election year as it is.
  • "game-changer." What you’re describing probably won’t change the game. But if it does, would you want to spoil the moment with a cliche?
  • "Guy Fieri." What if we all decided to just never mention him again? Would he disappear?
  • "hashtag." This refers to the spoken utterance of the word “hashtag,” often accompanied by air-quotes. People can see you doing this.
  • "hipster. Wearing glasses is not something people do because they’re hipsters; it’s something people do because they’re nearsighted. People don’t drink hot chocolate because it’s a hipster thing to do; they drink hot chocolate because it’s literally liquid chocolate. Yes, I wrote “literally.” That’s what happens when you use a word so casually and carelessly in think pieces as to render it meaningless.
  • "I can’t even." You can. Dig deep. Find your Kentucky.
  • "impact." (When used as a verb.)
  • "…in .gifs."
  • "…in one chart." We’re aiming high in 2014. Two chart minimum!
  • "listicle." This is the last one.
  • "literally the worst." Actually, while we’re at it, let’s ban "literally." Literally is the "not the Onion" of fake things.
  • "millennial." Young people are living with their parents because their parents’ generation destroyed the global economy. Next.
  • "nondescript office park." As opposed to the Frank Gehry ones.
  • "not the Onion.
  • "Rethuglicans, Repugs," "Republikkkans," "Demoncrats," "Dumbocrats," and every other variation thereof. Please just use the normal proper nouns; you can add whatever modifier you like before or after.
  • "selfie." But what do they tell us about our society, in the digital now? Let’s ask James Franco.
  • "Snowfall." (In the future, a high-cost digital production that doesn’t live up to the hype shall be known as a "Skyfall.")
  • "the Internets." This was a George W. Bush joke or something, right? You can still use the Internet—just drop the “s.”
  • "This Town."
  • "thought leader." Mostly beaten out of existence, but don’t think we didn’t notice that Paul Allen interview, Wired. You’re on notice.
  • #YOLO. Seriously.

Brooklyn Mall Bans Unaccompanied Minors After Rowdy Teens Cause Chaos



Dog Star re-posts from Gothamist:

On Thursday, there was utter pandemonium at Kings Plaza Mall in Brooklyn as hundreds of teenagers ran wildly through the shopping center, screaming, roughhousing and allegedly shoplifting. In response to the chaos, the mall only allowed teens under 18 inside on Friday if they came with an adult. Extra officers assigned to the mall were checking IDs outside the gates, and unaccompanied minors were asked to leave.

The chaos started after a Facebook post in which teens were urged to put Kings Plaza “on tilt” blew up. Fights broke out at the mall between several girls, while others grabbed at shoppers' bags and broke items in stores. "They had pepper spray. We attacked them because they attacked us,” Breeanah Thomas, 15, told CBS about confrontations with security. "They thought they were going to run us out, but they didn’t run me out."

"They just started fighting, throwing stuff off balconies," Lequan Jackson, a Macy's employee, told ABC. "I was just like I hope they don't come to my store." Keishawn Gibson, one of the witnesses who shot video of the brawl on his cell phone, told NBC there were multiple fights breaking out: "There was another fight in the other section of the mall, the same floor," he said. "There was another fight in the corner. There was just a lot of stuff happening at one time. It was just chaos. Everybody was just running from different directions, everyone was getting bumped, people was falling. It was madness."

Gibson thinks it's unfair that he has been banned from the mall as a result of the mall's new policy: "It wasn't everybody's fault, so for you to just ban everybody 17 and under is drastic," said Gibson.

10th GRADERS ONLY Apply Now! FREE! Scholars Program with College Prep at Cooper Hewitt Design Center

Scholars Program ONLY for Current 10th Graders

Welcome to the application page for Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum Scholars Program. The program is a component of DesignPrep, a series of free design-education programs for New York City high-school students, developed to introduce them to opportunities in design. 

Programs include design workshops with professional designers, college visits, studio visits, and portfolio development. Please ensure that all fields are completed in order to process your application. Incomplete application forms will not be processed. 

NEW DEADLINE: January 16, 2014 

In the event that you are selected to participate in the Scholars Program
* I understand that I am making a COMMITMENT to attend all required activities and must meet at the designated destination on time. Please select one of the following
* I am applying for the Sophomore Scholars Program (you must be a NYC high school Sophomore in Spring 2014) 

APPLY HERE

GO SEE these Exhibitions at NYC's Museums this Winter

Dog Star knows everyone gets so busy as soon as we return from summer vacations and return to school and jobs.  This can be your guide to the big exhibitions at NYC's museums this fall and a checklist to be sure you see the ones you want before they close.

THIS IS A PRINTER-FRIENDLY POST.  Just the one image above and all text in black to make it easy to print the list and keep it in your agenda or to refer to it and make dates to see these exhibitions with family and friends.

All of the museums have a free or pay-what-you-wish (it can be just $1) night so be sure to check the website - it is linked in BOLD in the name of the museum.

You may read about artists here that you've never heard of before - that's a good reason to check it out.  Read the list and make a plan to see at least three to start - pick one you are excited about seeing and invite your family.  Choose another one and invite two friends to join you!  On the third go by yourself - it will be an entirely different experience and you be doing less socializing, less talking, less talking ABOUT the art and MORE LOOKING. 

And always keep your phone in your pocket.  It's tough to make a real connection to the artwork if you are texting, taking pictures or researching.  Give yourself the chance to have a "phone-free" experience with art.

While we encourage everyone to see as many of these exhibitions as possible we know that's not likely to happen.  Here's FIVE (out of the fifteen listed below) that we think are DO NOT MISS SHOWS.  If you had to be selective - because of work schedules and school - we recommend these FIVE TO SEE IN THIS ORDER OF PRIORITY:

1.  Art Spiegelman at The Jewish Museum
2.  Wangechi Mutu at the Brooklyn Museum
3.  Leonardo da Vinci at the Morgan Library & Museum
4.  American Modern: Hopper to O'Keefe at Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
5.  Vermeer, Rembrandt and Hals at the Frick Collection

Finally, we've added one line called WHY GO? to express in a few words what's special, unusual or a rare opportunity to encourage devoted Dog Star readers to see an exhibition.

Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Hals: Masterpieces of Dutch Painting from the Mauritshuis
The Frick Collection
October 22, 2013 to January 19, 2014
The Frick Collection will be the final venue of an American tour of paintings from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague. This prestigious Dutch museum, which has not lent a large body of works from its holdings in nearly thirty years, is undergoing an extensive two-year renovation that makes this opportunity possible. A selection of fifteen masterpieces will be on view at The Frick Collection in New York from October 22, 2013, through January 19, 2014. Among the works going on tour are the famous Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer and The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, neither of which will have been seen by audiences in the United States in ten years.
WHY GO?  It just doesn't get better than this!  Go and discover the Dutch masters!  DO NOT MISS this exhibition!

Tiepolo, Guardi, and Their World: Eighteenth-Century Venetian Drawings
The Morgan Library & Museum
September 27, 2013 through January 5, 2014
The Morgan's collection of eighteenth-century Venetian drawings is among the world's finest, with more than 300 sheets by renowned masters Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770) and his son Domenico (1726–1804). Drawn entirely from the museum's holdings, Tiepolo, Guardi, and Their World features a selection of nearly one hundred works on paper and chronicles the vitality and originality of drawing during Venice's second Golden Age.
WHY GO?  Anybody who likes to draw and appreciates the very finest drawings will definitely want to see these real-life examples from some of the best ever made in history.

Leonardo da Vinci: Treasures from the Biblioteca Reale, Turin
The Morgan Library & Museum
October 25, 2013 through February 2, 2014
For the first time in New York, the Morgan presents Leonardo da Vinci's extraordinary Codex on the Flight of Birds, and one of his most celebrated drawings, Head of a Young Woman (Study for the Angel in the Virgin of the Rocks), together with a selection of other works on paper by the master and his followers. These exceptional works, on loan from the Biblioteca Reale in Turin, will be joined by the Morgan's Codex Huygens, a singularly important Renaissance manuscript recording many of Leonardo's ideas from his lost treatise on painting.
WHY GO?  It is a rare opportunity to see da Vinci drawings that may not come to NYC again for another 50 years.  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION!

Edgar Allan Poe: Terror of the Soul
The Morgan Library & Museum
October 4, 2013 through January 26, 2014
The works of Edgar Allan Poe have frightened and thrilled readers for more than one hundred-fifty years. Terror of the Soul—inspired by the preface to Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque—explores Poe's poetry, fiction, and literary criticism, with a key thematic emphasis examining his profound influence on later writers. The exhibition will feature nearly one hundred items.
WHY GO?  Poe is fascinating and this little exhibition will show his personal items (notebooks, manuscripts) as well as show how he influenced others.

Vasily Kandinsky: From Blaue Reiter to the Bauhaus, 1910-1925
Neue Galerie
October 3, 2013-February 10, 2014 
Vasily Kandinsky: From Blaue Reiter to the Bauhaus, 1910-1925, an exhibition of masterworks that explores the development of Kandinsky’s art over a crucial period of time: from the Blaue Reiter period into the pure abstraction and total environments of his Bauhaus years.
WHY GO?  Also a famous mural series the painter created for Thomas Campbell's NYC apartment will be on loan from the Museum of Modern Art and re-created inside the galleries; it will be like walking into a Kandinsky painting!

The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution
New York Historical Society
October 11, 2013 - February 23, 2014
Works by Duchamp, Matisse, Picasso, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh will be on display in The Armory Show at 100: Modern Art and Revolution, which revisits the famous 1913 New York Armory Show on its 100th anniversary. In 1913, the International Exhibition of Modern Art came to New York. Organized by a small group of American artists and presented at the Lexington Avenue Armory (and thus nicknamed the Armory Show), it introduced the American public to European avant-garde painting and sculpture. The public sensation and the polemical critical responses to the show represented a watershed in the history of American art, This exhibition is an exploration of how the Armory Show inspired seismic shifts in American culture, politics, and society.
WHY GO?  One hundred years ago the Armory Show was shocking to many Americans - find out why and discover how much our society has changed and not changed since then!

Art Spiegelman's Co-Mix: A Retrospective
The Jewish Museum
November 8, 2013 - March 23, 2014
This first U.S. retrospective celebrates the career of one of the most influential living comic artists. The exhibition spans Spiegelman’s career from his early days in underground comix to provocative New Yorker covers and artistic collaborations in new media. Included are over three hundred preparatory sketches, preliminary and final drawings, plus prints and other ephemeral and documentary material.
WHY GO?  Devoted Dog Star readers will discover a wider world of this artist's work beyond his graphic novels Maus I and Maus II.  Do not miss this exhibition!

Robert Motherwell:  Early Collage
Guggenheim Museum
September 27, 2013–January 5, 2014
Devoted exclusively to papier collés and related works on paper from the 1940s and early 1950s by Robert Motherwell, this exhibition examines the American artist’s origins and his engagement with collage, which he described in 1944 as “the greatest of our [art] discoveries.”
WHY GO?  Fans of collage and collage art will want to see a master creator whose work is stunning, imaginative and exciting!

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey
Brooklyn Museum
October 11, 2013–March 9, 2014
Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey is the first survey in the United States of this internationally renowned, Brooklyn-based artist. Spanning from the mid-1990s to the present, the exhibition unites more than fifty pieces, including Mutu’s signature large-scale collages as well as video works, never-before-seen sketchbook drawings, a site-specific wall drawing, and sculptural installations.
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION - You have never seen anything like this artists work and it will be an eye-opening and fresh experience!

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY:
Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath
Brooklyn Museum
November 8, 2013–February 2, 2014
WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath explores the experience of war with an unprecedented collection of 400 photographic prints, books, magazines, albums, and camera equipment, bringing together iconic and unknown images taken by members of the military, commercial portraitists, journalists, amateurs, artists, and numerous Pulitzer Prize–winning photographers. Including the work of some 255 photographers from around the globe who have covered conflicts over the last 165 years, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY examines the interrelationship between war and photography, reveals the evolution of the medium by which war is recorded and remembered, and explores the range of experience of armed conflict: recruitment, training, embarkation, daily routine, battle, death and destruction, homecoming, and remembrance.
WHY GO?  Fans of photography and photographers will enjoy this historical look at war photos through the years - including more recent conflicts.

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier:
From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk
Brooklyn Museum
October 25, 2013–February 23, 2014
The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, the first international exhibition dedicated to the groundbreaking French couturier. Playful, poetic, and transformative, Gaultier’s superbly crafted and detailed garments are inspired by the beauty and diversity of global cultures. This multimedia exhibition is organized around seven themes tracing the influences on Gaultier's development—from the streets of Paris to the cinema—since he emerged as a designer in the 1970s. It features approximately 140 haute couture and prêt-à-porter ensembles, from the designer’s earliest to his most recent collections, many of which are displayed on custom mannequins with interactive faces created by high-definition audiovisual projections. Accessories, sketches, stage costumes, excerpts from films, and documentation of runway shows, concerts, and dance performances, as well as photographs by fashion photographers and contemporary artists who stepped into Gaultier’s world, explore how his avant-garde designs challenge societal, gender, and aesthetic codes in unexpected ways.
WHY GO?  Fans of fashion and fashionistas will want to see an extraordinary designer's career in one place - exciting and inspiring!

American Modern: Hopper to O'Keefe
Museum of Modern Art 
August 17, 2013–January 26, 2014
Drawn from MoMA’s collection, American Modern takes a fresh look at the Museum’s holdings of American art made between 1915 and 1950, and considers the cultural preoccupations of a rapidly changing American society in the first half of the 20th century. Including paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and sculptures, American Modern brings together some of the Museum’s most celebrated masterworks, contextualizing them across mediums and amid lesser-seen but revelatory works by artists who expressed compelling emotional and visual tendencies of the time.
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION -  An opportunity to discover and re-discover modern American artists.

Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Lost Performance and the New Psychodrama - Manhattan
Whitney Museum of American Art
October 31, 2013-March 2014
This exhibition illuminates a radical period of 1970s performance art that flourished in downtown Manhattan, or what filmmaker and performance artist Jack Smith called “Rented Island,” and still remains largely unknown today. Working in lofts, storefronts, and alternative spaces, this group of artists, with backgrounds in theater, dance, music, and visual art, created complex new forms of performance to embody and address contemporary media, commercial culture, and high art.
WHY GO?  This exhibition will try to give a sense of the downtown performance scene in SoHo and the East Village in the 1970s - definitely for anybody who finds this time period and type of performance-based art fascinating.  This will be an eye-opening exhibition with installations, video and performance.

Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE
Whitney Museum of American Art
Sept 26, 2013–Jan 5, 2014 Robert Indiana (b. Robert Clark, 1928) first emerged on the wave of Pop Art that engulfed the art world in the early 1960s. Bold and visually dazzling, his work embraced the vocabulary of highway signs and roadside entertainments that were commonplace in post war America. Presciently, he used words to explore themes of American identity, racial injustice, and the illusion and disillusion of love. The appearance in 1966 of what became his signature image, LOVE, and its subsequent proliferation on unauthorized products, eclipsed the public’s understanding of the emotional poignancy and symbolic complexity of his art. This retrospective will reveal an artist whose work, far from being unabashedly optimistic and affirmative, addresses the most fundamental issues facing humanity—love, death, sin, and forgiveness—giving new meaning to our understanding of the ambiguities of the American Dream and the plight of the individual in a pluralistic society.
WHY GO?  You know the giant LOVE sculpture on Sixth Avenue near radio City Music Hall, right?  That's Robert Indiana.  But he did so much more and this exhibition gives us a chance to see it all together.

Julia Margaret Cameron
Metropolitan Museum 
August 19, 2013–January 5, 2014
One of the greatest portraitists in the history of photography, Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–1879) blended an unorthodox technique, a deeply spiritual sensibility, and a Pre- Raphaelite–inflected aesthetic to create a gallery of vivid portraits and a mirror of the Victorian soul. This will be the first New York City museum exhibition devoted to Cameron's work in nearly a generation, and the first ever at the Met.
WHY GO?  Go to discover an incredible female photographer who deserves more attention!

Balthus Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations
Metropolitan Museum
September 25, 2013–January 12, 2014
Balthus is best known for his series of pensive adolescents who dream or read in rooms that are closed to the outside world. Focusing on his finest works, the exhibition will be limited to approximately thirty-five paintings dating from the mid-1930s to the 1950s. Between 1936 and 1939, Balthus painted his celebrated series of portraits of Thérèse Blanchard, his young neighbor in Paris. Thérèse posed alone, with her cat, or with her two brothers. Never before shown in public will be the series of forty small ink drawings for Mitsou, in which the eleven-year-old Balthus evoked his adventures with a stray tomcat and which were published by the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke in 1921.
WHY GO? This is the first exhibition of the artist's works in this country in thirty years.  If you don't know this artist's paintings then this is your best chance to discover him!  He is amazing!

Iran Modern
Asia Society 
September 6, 2013 - January 5, 2014 
Asia Society is organizing a landmark exhibition, Iran Modern, that will focus on Iranian art created during the three decades leading up to the revolution of 1979. Asia Society’s aim is to shed light on a period when Iranian artists were engaged with the world through the Tehran Biennial in Iran as well as exhibitions overseas, and when their work was collected by institutions inside and outside of Iran. The exhibition maps the genesis of Iranian modernism in order to argue that the development of modernist art is inherently more globally interconnected than previously understood. The first major U.S. international loan exhibition on the subject, Iran Modern comprises over 100 paintings, sculpture, photography, and works on paper by the most noteworthy Iranian artists of the 1950s to 1970s, and provides a dynamic perspective on Iran’s rich culture and history for the public.
WHY GO?  We never get to see this kind of artwork and this will be a rare chance to see modern art from Iran.

The Shadows Took Shape
Studio Museum of Harlem 
Nov 14, 2013 - Mar 9, 2014
The Shadows Took Shape a dynamic interdisciplinary exhibition exploring contemporary art through the lens of Afrofuturist aesthetics. Coined in 1994 by writer Mark Dery in his essay “Black to the Future,” the term “Afrofuturism” refers to a creative and intellectual genre that emerged as a strategy to explore science fiction, fantasy, magical realism and pan-Africanism. With roots in the avant-garde musical stylings of sonic innovator Sun Ra (born Herman Poole Blount, 1914–1993), Afrofuturism has been used by artists, writers and theorists as a way to prophesize the future, redefine the present and reconceptualize the past. The Shadows Took Shape will be one of the few major museum exhibitions to explore the ways in which this form of creative expression has been adopted internationally and highlight the range of work made over the past twenty-five years.
WHY GO?  Discover artists who do bold, original and innovative work! 

Three Exhibitions at International Center of Photography (ICP)
International Center of Photography (ICP)
All three have same exhibition dates October 4, 2013–January 12, 2014

Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine's photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life's work.

Zoe Strauss: 10 Years
For a decade between 2001 and 2010, Philadelphia photographer Zoe Strauss (b. 1970) showed her photographic works once a year in a public space beneath an I-95 highway overpass in South Philadelphia. In these annual one-day exhibitions, Strauss mounted her color photographs to the concrete bridge supports and viewers could buy photocopies for five dollars. Through portraits and documents of houses and signage, Strauss looked unflinchingly at the economic struggles and hardscrabble lives of residents in her own community and other parts of the United States. She describes her work as "an epic narrative about the beauty and struggle of everyday life." Strauss, a self-taught photographer and political activist, sees her work as a type of social intervention, and she has often used billboards and public meetings as venues. This exhibition is a mid-career retrospective and the first critical assessment of her decade-long project.

JFK November 22, 1963: A Bystander's View of History
When President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963, the event and its aftermath were broadcast to a stunned nation through photography and television. Reporters used dramatic spot news photographs by professional photojournalists as well as snapshots by unsuspecting witnesses to explain the events: the shooting of the President, the hunt for the assassin, the swearing in of the new President, the widow's grief, the funeral, the shooting of Oswald. Viewers interpreted these photographs in various ways: to comprehend the shocking news, to negotiate their grief, to attempt to solve the crime. The combination of personal photographs assuming public significance and subjective interpretations of news images disrupted conventional views of photography as fact or evidence. JFK November 22, 1963: A Bystander's View of History examines the imaginative reception of these iconic photographs.
WHY GO?  Discover an influential photo-documentary master (Hine), how people's views and snapshots shape history (JFK) and meet the work of an incredibly talented contemporary photographer (Strauss).