Dog Star is A Creative Arts Guide for Teens


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DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

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Sunday, January 23, 2011

One-Picture-at-a-Time Project: Kazimir Malevich's MORNING IN THE VILLAGE AFTER SNOWSTORM at the Guggenheim Museum

One Picture-at-a-Time Project:  On December 31, The New York Times ran a story in which they asked their art critics to select favorite paintings hanging in New York City museums.  We will occasionally post ONE picture - and the writer's comments about it - as a new project for the new year.  We will also include our own picks to offer a wider range of visual art on view in our great art city.  We think this is a great way to learn about and enjoy great art in small bites!
Roberta Smith selects:






‘MORNING IN THE VILLAGE AFTER SNOWSTORM,’ BY MALEVICH, GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM Like so many works from the 1910s Malevich’s “Morning in the Village After Snowstorm” (1912) hovers deliciously between abstraction and representation, object and image, imagined and perceived.
Within two years of assembling this gleaming, scalloped vortex of snow drifts, peasants, houses and trees, Malevich would bring forth what is generally considered Western painting’s first pure abstraction, the first of his “Black Square” compositions, which he set against a field of white and described as a “full void.” In the Guggenheim painting we sense the fullness of his mystical void as an approaching whiteout, a kind of blazing light that threatens to burn away image. Strictly speaking, this would leave us with something closer to his “Suprematist Composition: White on White” of 1918, the tilting kitelike square of cool white on a slightly warmer white ground in the Museum of Modern Art.
In the meantime “Morning” ravishes the eye with its sparkling facets of red, blue, black and tan, shaded to white. The gaze moves through the scene like an icebreaker. The forms heave to either side, nearly filling the available space but leaving a narrow path to a tiny figure pulling a sled in the distance. One-point perspective and the Renaissance notion of the picture plane as a window are bid fond farewell.
Among the crowning achievements of that marvelous Russian mongrel Cubo-Futurism, “Morning” has Malevich both scaling up and calming down Cézanne’s anxious cylinders, spheres and especially cones to the point of majesty. Malevich then enlists them to render country life as he knew it from his childhood, a return to roots that proved similarly effective for other early modernist painters, including Kandinsky, Gabriele Münter, Chagall and, as we shall see, Miró.
The smoothness of Malevich’s paint application adds to the forms’ metallic sheen. We are in the world of Dorothy’s Tin Man, a realm in which, if you cast the mind forward a bit, you can imagine both the metal Minimalist boxes of Donald Judd and the fluorescent glow ofDan Flavin’s light installations.

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