Dog Star is A Creative Arts Guide for Teens


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Image above: West Gallery of The Frick Collection

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"Thank you for DogStarNYC, in general. The site speaks to so many kinds of interests; it discerns which qualities will appeal to many different tastes in a tremendous number of activities. I love how it encourages young people to pay attention to the unusual.

In New York we let so many teens walk around the periphery, mildly shell-shocked by life, while the information that they need to make sense of their world sits in the center of the room. DogStarNYC welcomes them into the middle of the room; the blog tells them how to walk there." - Stacy L.

EMAIL: dogstarcontact@gmail.com

DOG STAR is the creation of a high school English teacher in New York City. This blog began in 2008 as an online community for a journalism class and has since evolved into a curated site on the creative arts, arts-related news and a guide to free and low-cost events for teens. Our mission is to offer teens real-life options for enjoying all the creative arts in New York City. May wisdom guide you and hope sustain you. The more you like art, the more art you like!

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Paris as Camera Obscura

Entire apartment turned into camera obscura

The pinhole camera is the oldest camera in the world. The basic premise is that light entering through a tiny hole can display inverted pictures of the outside world in a dark room. The most popular camera working with this system is the ‘camera obscura’ that features a light-proof box with a small hole cut in it. But French photographers Romain Alary and Antoine Levi decided to think one step bigger. With their project Stenop.es they turn entire apartments into ‘camera obscuras’.

By turning rooms into a pinhole camera, they project the outside world onto the inside so that the city outside merges with the interior of the apartment. The result creates a collage of tactile and projected, turning upside down buildings into surreal reflections of kitchen implements and planting a row of trees jittering on apartment walls.  Source:  iGNANT





PARIS ● STENOP.ES ● from Romain Alary on Vimeo.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Kahlo & Rivera at Home (1939)



In 1939 Nickolas Muray shot a home movie of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera at their home.

Kahlo & Rivera's Love

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera have a tempestuous relationship: she worships him and he admires her. In 1929, Rivera starts an affair with Kahlo’s younger sister, Cristina Kahlo, who becomes Rivera’s mistress. When Kahlo learns of the affair in 1934, she leaves Rivera and moves into her own apartment. The couple later get back together, but in 1939 they divorce.
Their love is still so strong, though, that they get back together and remarry the following year. Kahlo writes numerous poems to Rivera in her diary and depicts him with tenderness in her works. The most famous of these paintings is the striking Diego on My Mind (1943), which can be experienced in the exhibition.


Directed Romance
 


In 1939, Nickolas Muray, a friend of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, shoots a home movie of the couple at their home, Casa Azul. Muray is a highly esteemed photographer in the 1930s and a pioneer of colour photography. The video shows Kahlo posing, lightly flirting with the camera and strolling in the garden with Rivera. Kahlo seems as engaged in acting for the camera as in Rivera’s romantic gesture. 



Monday, September 15, 2014

GO SEE these Exhibitions at NYC's Museums this Autumn/Winter


Dog Star's mini-guide to the Fall/Winter museum exhibitions.

THIS IS A PRINTER-FRIENDLY POST.  Just the one image above and all text in black to make it easy to print the list.  

Keep it in your agenda or refer to it and make dates to see these exhibitions with family and friends.

All of the museums have a free or pay-what-you-wish (it can be just $1) night so be sure to check the website - it is linked in BOLD in the name of the museum.

GETTING TO THE MUSEUMS - MAKE IT EASY WITH FRIENDS
You may read about artists here that you've never heard of before - that's a good reason to check it out.  Read the list and make a plan to see at least three to start - pick one you are excited about seeing and invite your family.  Choose another one and invite two friends to join you!  On the third go by yourself - it will be an entirely different experience and you would be doing less socializing, less talking, less talking ABOUT the art and MORE LOOKING. 

PRETEND YOU'VE LOST YOUR PHONE
And always keep your phone in your pocket.  It's tough to make a real connection to the artwork if you are texting, taking pictures or researching.  Give yourself the chance to have a "phone-free" experience with art. 

DOG STAR'S TOP FIVE PICKS - DON'T MISS THESE SHOWS
While we encourage everyone to see as many of these exhibitions as possible we know that's not likely to happen.  (There are about 35 exhibitions listed here.)  Here's FIVE that we think are DO NOT MISS SHOWS.  If you had to be selective - because of work schedules and school - we recommend these FIVE TO SEE IN THIS ORDER OF PRIORITY:

1.  Matisse at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
2.  Romare Bearden at the Wallach Art Gallery (Columbia University)
3.  Nam June Paik at the Asia Society
4.  Sebastião Salgado at the International Center of Photography (ICP)
5.  Annie Leibovitz at The New York Historical Society

Finally, we've added one line called WHY GO? to encourage Dog Star readers to see an exhibition.


Under Another Name
Studio Museum in Harlem
Jul 17, 2014 - Mar 8, 2015
Under Another Name borrows its title from a line that appears in Renée Green’s letterpress print William Morris. In it, she cites William Morris, a 19th century English artist, writer, textile designer and socialist. In his novel A Dream of John Ball (1888), which Green quotes, he writes: “I pondered...how men fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of their defeat, and when it comes turns out not to be what they meant, and other men have to fight for what they meant under another name…” Under Another Name considers work in multiple media, focusing on the relationship of various genres and media to one another. Here, ephemeral sculptures are captured as photographs; letterpress prints invoke the aesthetics of video; performances are recorded as drawings; sound is captured in objects; and photographs are abstracted into paintings. Rather than privileging one medium over another, the exhibition looks at their interdependence and what happens when a work is understood through the context of a new medium.
WHY GO?  Don't miss the inventive and creative ways artists make images and objects.

PLAYING WITH FIRE: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions
El Museo del Barrio
September 4, 2014 – January 3, 2015
Tracing the founding of El Museo del Barrio by Raphael Montañez Ortíz at the end of the 60s, an era of social unrest and radical activism in the United States as well as throughout the Americas, the works in this exhibition target colonialism, imperialism, urban neglect, and cultural hegemony with a vast array of weapons, including irreverence and humor. The artists confront the status quo with a wide range of disarming conceptual strategies and aesthetic detonators. The fire that surfaces in some of the artworks points to an equally dangerous and alluring element that consumes and transforms, one that must be handled with care.
WHY GO?  Go to discover how activists expressed their rage and social agenda in their artwork.

Francesco Clemente: Inspired by India
Rubin Museum of Art
September 5, 2014 - February 2, 2015
The first museum exhibition devoted to the Indian influences in Clemente’s work and how they relate to the artistic practices and traditions of various regions in India features approximately 20 works, including paintings from the last 30 years, and four new, larger than life-size sculptures created especially for the exhibition. In contrast to leading conceptual art practices of the 1970s, Clemente refocused attention on representation, narrative, and the figure, and explored traditional, artisanal materials and modes of working.
WHY GO?  Don't miss this opportunity to see an amazing artist's paintings and sculpture inspired by the traditions of India - there will be a spiritual component to the whole exhibition.

Egon Schiele: Portraits 
Neue Galerie 
October 9, 2014-January 19, 2015
This autumn Neue Galerie New York will open "Egon Schiele: Portraits," a special exhibition devoted to portraiture created by the masterful Austrian artist Egon Schiele. This is the first exhibition at an American museum to focus exclusively on portraiture in Schiele's work.
WHY GO?  Egon was the bad boy artist of his times - like Basquiat in 1980s New York City.  Life during Egon's time (end of the 19th century, early years of the 20th century) was very conservative but he had an open, fresh and liberal idea about how to show people and their personalities.  The twisted body shapes and the expressive line that characterize Schiele's paintings and drawings mark the artist as an early exponent of Expressionism.  He is a true original who died of the Spanish Flu at age 28.

Matisse:  The Cut-Outs
Museum of Modern Art 
October 12, 2014–February 8, 2015
Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is a groundbreaking reassessment of this important body of work. The largest and most extensive presentation of the cut-outs ever mounted, the exhibition includes approximately 100 cut-outs—borrowed from public and private collections around the globe—along with a selection of related drawings, prints, illustrated books, stained glass, and textiles. The last time New York audiences were treated to an in-depth look at the cut-outs was in 1961.
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION -  An opportunity to discover and re-discover this great modern master.  Go see his masterpiece "ZULMA" - completed at age 80!

Also at MoMA:
Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor - October 4, 2014–January 18, 2015
The Heart Is Not a Metaphor is the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober’s career to take place in the United States. Gober (American, b. 1954) rose to prominence in the mid-1980s and was quickly acknowledged as one of the most significant artists of his generation. Early in his career he made deceptively simple sculptures of everyday objects—beginning with sinks before moving on to domestic furniture such as playpens, beds, and doors. In the 1990s, his practice evolved from single works to theatrical room-sized environments. Featuring loans from institutions and private collections in North America and Europe, along with selections from the artist’s collection, the exhibition includes around 130 works across several mediums, including individual sculptures and immersive sculptural environments and a distinctive body of drawings, prints, and photographs. The loosely chronological presentation traces the development of this remarkable body of work, highlighting themes and motifs that emerged in the early 1980s and continue to inform Gober’s work today.

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters - Through March 1, 2015
This exhibition is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

El Greco in New York
Metropolitan Museum of Art
November 4, 2014–February 1, 2015 To commemorate the four-hundredth anniversary of the death of El Greco, the Metropolitan Museum and the Hispanic Society of America are pooling their collections of the work of this great painter to provide a panorama of his art unrivaled outside the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The Frick Collection will display its paintings contemporaneously. This is a unique opportunity to see this artist's work, which exerted such a strong impact on modern painting and especially appealed to New York collectors.
WHY GO?  A unique opportunity to see in one place several paintings by the Greek painter ("El Greco") who moved to Toledo, Spain and painted with such power and energy.

Cubism: The Leonard Lauder Collection
Metropolitan Museum of Art
October 20, 2014–February 16, 2015
Cubism, the most influential art movement of the early twentieth century, still resonates today. It destroyed traditional illusionism in painting and radically changed the way we see the world. The Leonard A. Lauder Collection, unsurpassed in its holdings of Cubist art, is now a promised gift to the Museum. On the occasion of this exhibition, the Collection will be shown in public for the first time—eighty paintings, collages, drawings, and sculpture by the four preeminent Cubist artists: Georges Braque (French, 1882–1963), Juan Gris (Spanish, 1887–1927), Fernand Léger (French, 1881–1955), and Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973).
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION -  It will be a very long time before you see this collection together again.  It will show the best of the best by these four Cubist artists.

Also at the Met:
Madame Cézanne - November 19, 2014–March 15, 2015
Madame Cézanne, the first exhibition of the paintings, drawings, and watercolors by Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) of his most painted model, Hortense Fiquet (1850–1922), will open at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on November 19. The exhibition will trace Cézanne’s lifelong attachment to the woman who was his model, his wife, and the mother of his son, Paul. She profoundly inflected his portrait practice for more than two decades, yet despite this long liaison, she was not well received—by either his family or his friends.

Paul Cézanne: Drawings and Watercolors from the Metropolitan Museum’s Collection will be on view from November 18, 2014 through March 15, 2015.
WHY GO?  Cézanne is the "godfather" of European modern art and had a big influence on Picasso, Matisse and the Cubist painters.  Go to enjoy a painter who has one foot int he 19th century and the other foot in the forward-looking modern age of the 20th century.

Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey
Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University
November 15–December 13, 2014 and January 21–March 14, 2015
Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey presents and explores the artist's 1977 cycle of collages and watercolors based on Homer's Odyssey. One of the most esteemed and beloved African American artists of the 20th century, Romare Bearden (1911 – 1988) underscores the epic text in the service of his most significant artistic theme: searching for a way home. Bearden works with and against Homer, translating the ancient stories through a 20th–century visual voice while considering their enduring relevance. Bearden's black characters raise the issue of race, inviting us to consider the Odyssey as a truly global classic.
WHY GO?  DO NOT MISS THIS EXHIBITION -  Bearden is a true American original - an artist with his own vision and style and always engaging.  Go to see his incredible use of collage to create scenes from this mythical tale.

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis 
International Center of Photography (ICP) 
September 19, 2014–January 11, 2015 Genesis is the third long-term series on global issues by world-renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado (born Brazil, 1944), following Workers (1993) and Migrations (2000). The result of an eight-year worldwide survey, the exhibition draws together more than 200 spectacular black-and-white photographs of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes, and indigenous peoples—raising public awareness about the pressing issues of environment and climate change.
WHY GO?  Salgado is one of the great masters of large-scale photography and this exhibition will be engaging and informative.

Two Exhibitions at The Frick Collection

Frick Collection
El Greco at The Frick Collection
November 4, 2014 to February 1, 2015
To celebrate the 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death, the Frick continues its 2014 focus on the artist, which began with Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to Face (August 5–October 26, 2014), with an installation organized in conjunction with El Greco in New York, opening in November at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Frick will unite its three remarkable El Greco paintings — Purification of the Temple and portraits of Vincenzo Anastagi and St. Jerome — showing them together, for the first time, on one wall of the East Gallery.
WHY GO?  Not sure why the Frick didn't loan these El Grecos to the Met for the big show up the block but they have agreed to put their El Grecos on display at the same time.  Think of this as El Greco Part 2 for the Met exhibition.

Masterpieces from the Scottish National Gallery
November 5, 2014 to February 1, 2015
In November, The Frick Collection will be the first venue to present a touring group of masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland. The ten paintings to be featured in New York include a Botticelli never before on public view in the United States.
WHY GO?  Because you have never seen these paintings unless you've been to Scotland.

The Morgan Library - Fall/Winter Exhibitions

The Morgan Library
From Here to Here: Richard McGuire Makes a Book
September 25 through November 9, 2014
The exhibition combines original drawings for the strip and the novel with source photographs, books that influenced the form and content of McGuire's invention, and collages and sketchbooks that afford glimpses into his creative process.

The Untamed Landscape: Théodore Rousseau and the Path to Barbizon 
September 26, 2014 through January 18, 2015
Comprising seventy works from private and public collections, including the Morgan Library & Museum, this exhibition will consider the artist's wide-ranging achievements as a draftsman and his particular approach to the open-air oil sketch.

Cy Twombly: Treatise on the Veil 
September 26, 2014 through January 25, 2015
This exhibition showcases Cy Twombly's monumental painting Treatise on the Veil (Second Version), executed in Rome in 1970, and its related drawings, all from the Menil Collection in Houston.

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece 
October 17, 2014 through January 4, 2015
The spectacular Crusader Bible is one of the greatest illuminated manuscripts in the world, renowned as much for its unrivalled and boldly colored illustrations as it is for its fascinating history.

NY Historical Society - Two Exhibitions

New York Historical Society
Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion
September 26, 2014 - April 19, 2015
Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion explores the centuries-long history of trade and immigration between China and the United States—a history that involved New York from its very beginnings—and will raise the question “What does it mean to be an American?” The exhibit narrative extends from the late eighteenth century to the present and includes all regions of the country, thus interpreting the Chinese American saga as a key part of American history.
WHY GO?  An important history that deserves to be told - this museum always does a superb and complete job of presenting all kinds of history and this will be an eye opening and engaging experience.

Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage
November 21, 2014 - February 22, 2015
Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage charts a new direction for one of America’s best-known living photographers. Unlike her staged and carefully lit portraits made on assignment for magazines and advertising clients, the photographs in this exhibition were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject. The images speak in a commonplace language to the photographer’s curiosity about the world she inherited, spanning landscapes both dramatic and quiet, interiors of living rooms and bedrooms, and objects that are talismans of past lives.
WHY GO?  Go to discover what happens when a legendary portrait photographer takes a new path to investigate new subjects and new experiences in her photography.

The Jewish Museum - Two Exhibitions

The Jewish Museum 
From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945–1952
September 12, 2014 - February 1, 2015
Through select paintings by both artists, this exhibition offers a revealing parallel view of two key Abstract Expressionists. Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, a woman and an African American, each experimented with approaches that joined abstraction and cultural specificity. Their work similarly brims with gesture, image, and incident, yet was often overlooked by critics in their time.
WHY GO?  Finally we have an exhibition that honors the place of both women and African-American men in the story of abstract expressionism.  Most exhibitions of these painters have only the circle of white men who huddled together at the Cedar Tavern.

Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power
October 31, 2014 - March 22, 2015
This is the first museum exhibition to focus on the cosmetics entrepreneur Helena Rubinstein (1872 – 1965). Rubinstein – as businesswoman and arts patron – helped break down the status quo of taste by blurring the boundaries between commerce, art, fashion, beauty, and design. Her innovative business and style challenged conservative taste and helped usher in a modern notion of beauty, democratized and accessible to all. Beauty Is Power will reunite much of Rubinstein’s famed collection, including modern artworks by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Elie Nadelman, and Joan Miró, among others, as well as her iconic collection of African and Oceanic sculpture, miniature period rooms, jewelry, and fashion.
WHY GO?  Go to find out more about a powerful female role model who used his wealth to collect great modern art.

Crossing Brooklyn: Art from Bushwick, Bed-Stuy, and Beyond
Brooklyn Museum
October 3, 2014–January 4, 2015
Reflecting the rich creative diversity of Brooklyn, Crossing Brooklyn presents work by thirty-five Brooklyn-based artists or collectives. The exhibition and related programming take place in the galleries and on the grounds of the Museum, as well as off-site in the streets, waterways, and other public spaces of the borough. While acknowledging Brooklyn’s heightened profile, Crossing Brooklyn presents a multigenerational picture that recognizes the borough’s long-established role as a creative center. Other themes explored in the exhibition include history and memory, place and geography, community, nostalgia, exchange, ephemerality, and politics, both local and remote.  
WHY GO?  Brooklyn artists get much respect in this borough-wide exhibition that features new and long-time artists in a giant show together.  Go to see the wide talent and creative expression coming out of Brooklyn.

Also at the Brooklyn Museum:
Judith Scott - October 24, 2014-March 29, 2015
Born in Columbus, Ohio, with Down syndrome, Scott (1943–2005) was also largely deaf and did not speak. Judith Scott’s work is celebrated for its astonishing visual complexity. In a career spanning just seventeen years, Scott developed a unique and idiosyncratic method to produce a body of work of remarkable originality. Often working for weeks or months on individual pieces, she used yarn, thread, fabric, and other fibers to envelop found objects into fastidiously woven, wrapped, and bundled structures.
WHY GO?  Don't miss an opportunity to see the work of an unconventional artist - Scott is not someone we normally think of as being artistic or an artist and yet she creates powerful and strange work.  She demands we respect all kinds of expression from the fullest range of human beings.

Guggenheim Museum - Two Exhibitions

Guggenheim Museum
V. S. Gaitonde: Painting as Process, Painting as Life
October 24, 2014–February 11, 2015
Comprising 45 major paintings and works on paper drawn from 30 leading public institutions and private collections across Asia, Europe, and the United States, this is the first retrospective exhibition dedicated to the work of celebrated Indian modern painter Vasudeo Santu Gaitonde (1924–2001).

Wang Jianwei: Time Temple
October 31, 2014–February 16, 2015
Wang Jianwei: Time Temple comprises an intricately designed exhibition space, a film, and a performance art event, exploring the role of time-based art practices in contemporary Chinese art for the first commission of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative at the Guggenheim Museum. Wang Jianwei was born 1958 in Suining, Sichuan Province, Southwest China, and is widely recognized for his bold experiments in new media art.

Nam June Paik: Becoming Robot
Asia Society
September 5, 2014 through January 4, 2015
Nam June Paik (1932–2006) was a visionary artist, thinker, and innovator. Considered the “father of video art,” his groundbreaking use of video technology blurred past distinctions between science, fine art, and popular culture to create a new visual language. Paik’s interest in exploring the human condition through the lens of technology and science has created a far-reaching legacy that may be seen in broad recognition of new media art and the growing numbers of subsequent generations of artists who now use various forms of technology in their work.
WHY GO?  Don't miss this show - this guy practically invented video art and everything we have today such as arena sized video projections and music videos comes directly from his pioneering ideas and artwork.

Chris Ofili: Night and Day
New Museum of Contemporary Art
Ocgtober 29, 2014 through February 1, 2015
“Chris Ofili: Night and Day” will span the artist’s influential career, encompassing his work in painting, drawing, and sculpture. Over the past two decades, Ofili has become identified with vibrant, meticulously executed, elaborate artworks that meld figuration, abstraction, and decoration. In his extremely diverse oeuvre, Ofili has taken imagery and inspiration from such disparate, century-spanning sources as the Bible, hip-hop music, Zimbabwean cave paintings, blaxploitation films, and William Blake’s poems.
WHY GO?  Go because this is going to be fun.  Chris has a bad rep but this will show peopel he does more than one kind of artwork.  (Go here to see why he got into trouble - at the link scroll down to New York section.)

New Territories:  
Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America
Museum of Art & Design (MAD)
November 4, 2014 to April 6, 2015
The term “new territories,” as evoked by Italian architect and designer Gaetano Pesce, refers to the state of making in today’s globalized society, a phenomenon that has helped to spur a confluence of art, design and craft. The exhibition New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America will examine this trend in several distinct cities throughout Latin America, where some of the most pertinent new directions in arts and design are emerging today. New Territories explores the collaborations between small manufacturing operations and craftspersons, artists, and designers, and demonstrates how the resulting work addresses not only the issues of commodification and production, but also of urbanization, displacement and sustainability. The exhibition will explore a number of key themes, including: the dialogue between contemporary trends and artistic legacies in Latin American art; the use of repurposed materials in strategies of upcyling; the blending of digital and traditional skills; and the reclamation of personal and public space.
WHY GO?  Don't miss this opportunity to see inventive new forms and materials.

Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art
Queens Museum of Art
September 21, 2014 through January 4, 2015
Anonymous is an exploration of changing attitudes towards self-expression, attribution, and identity in contemporary Tibetan art. Traditional Tibetan culture placed little emphasis on individuality or artistic self-expression. Art adhered to a formal system of production to support the transmission of Tibetan religious culture and was, by and large, unattributed” artists remained anonymous. However, in the global contemporary market, the creativity of the individual has become the primary basis by which we produce, interpret and consume art. Innovation and novelty are often valued more highly than technique and tradition. Attribution ”the artists name” has become a fundamental aspect of the work. Within the new social reality as part of the Peoples Republic of China, art is becoming a vital medium of self-expression for Tibetans. Artists are increasingly focused on the experience of the individual and a cautious 21st-century visual language steeped in irony, metaphor and allusion has fully emerged.
WHY GO?  We don't always get the chance to see Tibetan art and this show will offer a chance to experience this culture in a large exhibition.

Mac Conner: A New York Life
Museum of the City of New York (MCNY)
September 10, 2014 - January 11, 2015
The New York saga of one of the original "Mad Men."
McCauley (“Mac”) Conner (born 1913) grew up admiring Norman Rockwell magazine covers in his father’s general store. He arrived in New York as a young man to work on wartime Navy publications and stayed on to make a career in the city’s vibrant publishing industry. The exhibition presents Conner’s hand-painted illustrations for advertising campaigns and women’s magazines like Redbook and McCall’s, made during the years after World War II when commercial artists helped to redefine American style and culture.

Also at the Museum of the City of New York:
Assembled Realities: Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao's New York
October 15, 2014 - February 15, 2015
Assembled Realities: Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao's New York features more than 40 works by this Taiwanese artist, who came to New York at 18 to study photography. Pushing the boundaries of traditional documentary photography, Liao (b. 1977) creates large-scale panoramas by combining multiple exposures of the same location taken over the course of several hours. The resulting composite photographs are often fantastical; complex, hyper-real views that no single shot—or the eye—could capture. Liao has spent the past decade honing his distinctive style, making images of his adopted city from the Grand Concourse to Coney Island, the old Shea Stadium to the 72nd Street Subway.
WHY GO?  Don't miss the old time "Mad Men" artwork and the wild photos.

Ernest Cole: Photographer
NYU - Grey Art Gallery
September 3 through December 6, 2014
Ernest Cole (1940–90), one of South Africa’s first black photojournalists, compassionately but unflinchingly portrayed the lives of black people as they negotiated apartheid’s racist laws and oppression. Ernest Cole: Photographer features over 100 rare black-and-white gelatin silver prints from Cole’s remarkable archive. While many of the photo-graphs expose segregation, destitution, and violence, others depict intimate moments of children at play, mothers smiling, couples dancing, and friends joking. Cole was arrested and fled South Africa in 1966, never to return. This is the first major solo museum show of his striking images, which are illuminated by incisive captions from his book House of Bondage (1967).
WHY GO?  Don't miss this chance to see the photos of an important South African photographer.

Garden of Unearthly Delights:
Works by Ikeda, Tenmyouya & teamLab
Japan Society
October 10, 2014 through January 11, 2015
A monster tsunami uproots a city. Modern tough guys lock samurai-style in battle. Candy-colored streams of animals and flowers hyperpixilate. These dramatic visual moments are among many to be encountered this fall in our new exhibition Garden of Unearthly Delights. The featured artists Manabu Ikeda (b. 1973, Saga Prefecture), Hisashi Tenmyouya (b. 1966, Tokyo) and the art and technology collective teamLab (est. 2001) are today's takumi, or master artisans, taking pride in the execution of dense and precisely detailed works requiring time and contemplation to grasp. Their creative imaginations travel through time, finding inspiration in a range of styles; from medieval Buddhist paintings to contemporary anime and manga. Come stroll through their fantastical visions.
WHY GO?  Go to see current artwork by major Japanese artists!

Beyond the Supersquare
Bronx Museum of the Arts
May 1, 2014 to January 11, 2015
Beyond the Supersquare explores the indelible influence of Latin American and Caribbean modernist architecture on contemporary art. The exhibition features over 30 artists and more than 60 artworks, including photography, video, sculpture, installation, and drawing, that respond to major Modernist architectural projects constructed in Latin America and the Caribbean from the 1920s through the 1960s. Beyond the Supersquare examines the complicated legacies of modernism through architecture and thought—as embodied by the political, economic, environmental, and social challenges faced by countries throughout Latin America—through the unique perspective of artists working today. This exhibition is co-organized by Holly Block (New York City) and María Inés Rodríguez (Colombia), and designed by Benedeta Monteverde (Mexico).
WHY GO?  This place is amazing and it's so easy to reach on the Grand Concourse - go discover it for yourself!

Also at the Bronx Museum:
Here I Am: Photographs by Lisa Leone
September 11, 2014 to January 11, 2015
The Bronx - Paris - Los Angeles - early 1990s - hip hop. This culture of music, dance, art and fashion is forever in its nascent and most authentic in Here I Am: Photographs by Lisa Leone. From Nas in the first studio recordings for what would become his iconic debut album Illmatic, to Snoop on the set of his first video, from ingénue Debi Mazar on the subway to Grandmaster Flash at a RockSteady reunion, Leone’s photographs open portals to the sounds, places and, most importantly, the people who forged and continue to influence the energy that is hip hop.




FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! Go See Warhol at Baruch College's Mishkin Gallery



Baruch College presents the exhibition Andy Warhol: Celebrating the Famous and The Unknown at the Mishkin Gallery from Thursday, September 19 to Monday, October 20. An opening reception will take place on Thursday, September 18 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Andy Warhol is an icon of American Pop Art. In the 1960s, Warhol appropriated images from popular culture such as Campbell’s soup cans, Brillo soap boxes, and the faces of popular figures such as Jackie Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. His work was revolutionary and created a sensation in both the art world and with the general public. While Warhol’s dramatic, colorful prints are familiar to the public, his photographs are less well-known and provide an interesting topic for study and exhibition.

More than 70 of Warhol’s Polaroids and black and white photographs, as well as several silkscreen prints, will be on view at Baruch College’s Mishkin Gallery. The photos were acquired by the gallery via a grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and are part of the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Project. The silkscreen prints were also donated by the Andy Warhol Foundation.

From 1970 to 1985, Andy Warhol took thousands of Polaroid photographs mostly with his Polaroid Big Shot plastic camera. These images provide an intimate glimpse into the mind of a celebrated artist at work. He photographed people both famous and unknown, viewing all these images as his “sketches,” or source material for future paintings and silkscreen prints.

The silkscreen prints and photographs included in this exhibition primarily feature figurative subjects, from famous faces such as Queen Beatrix, Sylvester Stallone, Sitting Bull, Dolly Parton, Dorothy Hamill, and Yoko Ono with her son Sean Lennon, to portraits of obscure or anonymous individuals. Warhol was, in fact, drawn to the pedestrian and commonplace as much as to spectacle and glamour, a characteristic particularly evident in his black and white photos. A study in casual spontaneity, these pictures attest to Warhol’s enduring fascination with the mundane. Many of his black and white photographs are scenes of people, buildings, or cars on the street. Collectively, they form a kind of visual diary of his comings and goings.

“I’ve never met a person I couldn’t call a beauty,” Warhol once said, and indeed these photos reveal a profound and frank, albeit fleeting, engagement with his subjects. As he did in his more famous work, Warhol used repetition and ritual in his photographs, often snapping a dozen or more carefully posed images of the same individual. The effect was to undermine or destabilize the iconic status that a single portrait can create. This tactic also tended to reveal the true idiosyncrasies of his subjects.
“Everyone Will Be Famous for 15 Minutes,” was Warhol’s most famous adage. These photographs illuminate the essential truth of this proposition, while also creating a record of the gaudy, passing glamour of the 1970s combined with nostalgia for the Polaroid snapshot. In those pre-digital times, the Polaroid was a good way of instantly capturing a moment in time.

Ranging from 1972 to 1986, with some undated examples, the Warhol silkscreens and photographs encompass more than a decade of images of famous and anonymous figures that, together, form a unique portrait of popular culture as envisioned by one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th Century.

The Mishkin Gallery is located at 135 E. 22nd Street in Manhattan.  Gallery hours are Monday – Thursday, noon to 5 pm; Thursday, noon to 7 pm.  The gallery is free and open to the public. For information about this exhibition, please call Gallery Director, Sandra Kraskin, at the Sidney Mishkin Gallery (646) 660-6652.

Choose Wisely


Sunday, September 14, 2014

Dog Star Selects Nakagin Capsule Tower (Micro Apartment Building from 1972, Tokyo)

The building is actually composed of two interconnected concrete towers, respectively eleven and thirteen floors, which house 140 prefabricated modules (or "capsules") which are each self-contained units.

The original target demographic were bachelor salarymen. The compact apartments included a wall of appliances and cabinets built into one side, including a kitchen stove, a refrigerator, a television set, and a reel-to-reel tape deck. A bathroom unit, about the size of an aircraft lavatory, is set into an opposite corner. A large circular window over a bed dominates the far end of the room.


Photographs by Noritaka Minami.

Go here to read more about the apartment tower - most likely to be demolished soon.








 
 

Saturday, September 13, 2014

FREE! NEXT WEEKEND! Go See International Hip-Hop Night @ BAMcafé Live

BAMcafé Live and SOURCE360 Present “International Hip-Hop Night”
 
Sat, Sep 20, 2014 - 10PM 
 
FREE!
 
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
 

Hosted by Toni Blackman
Featuring Amkoullel, Gokh Bi System, Rebel Diaz, Shokanti, Ayoinmotion and Bocafloja

The Source goes global with International Hip-Hop Night, featuring emcees from around the world spitting lyrics and freestyles in Bambara, French, Wolof, Spanish, Portugese, English, and more. Hosted by Toni Blackman, the Department of State’s first Hip-Hop Cultural Envoy, the event features: Malian rapper Amkoullel (Mic Check, 2013 Winter/Spring), who has performed with artists including Ali Farka Touré, Toumani Diabaté, and Rokia Traoré; Senegal’s Gokh Bi System, a socially conscious hip-hop trio that has played major festivals around the world, including Celebrate Brooklyn and Montreal Jazz Festival; Chile’s Rebel Diaz, a political duo that has toured the US, Latin America, and Europe, and dropped its debut album, The Radical Dilemma, in 2013; Shokanti, who fuses hip-hop and reggae with the rhythms of his native island of Cape Verde and was the first hip-hop artist ever to perform for the Prime Minister of Cape Verde at the Government Palace; Nigeria’s AYoinmotion, who plays with his own live band and has performed at SOB’s, the Apollo Theater, and a number of major universities; and political rapper and poet Bocafloja, who has released six full-length albums and is one of the most revered icons on the Mexican hip-hop scene. 

BAMcafé Live Host: Phillip Andry
BAMcafé Live House DJ: DJ Idlemind “The Appropriate Agent”

Ask a Slave

Meet Lizzie Mae. Lizzie Mae is the personal housemaid to President and Lady Washington — or, what is more commonly known as a slave.

Actually, Lizzie Mae is actress Azie Mira Dungey, a former "living history character" at George Washington's Virginia plantation, Mount Vernon.

In Ask A Slave, a new comedy web series directed by Jordan Black, Dungey finally gets to answer some of the more asinine questions asked by estate visitors over the years.

Friday, September 12, 2014

FREE! ¡Fiesta! Celebrate Latin America / Celebren América Latina @ The Met Museum



SPREAD THE WORD ABOUT THIS FREE EVENT!  If you don't have kids then take your nieces, nephews and younger cousins!

The Met is hosting ¡Fiesta! Celebrate Latin America / Celebren América Latina on SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 from 1-5pm and it's all free!

One of the fantastic activities is this spoken word workshop with Lemon!

If you know anyone with young kids (under age 12) then def go to the Met and meet Lemon!  Or just go to The Met for the party, um, I mean, Fiesta!

Dog Star Selects William Blake's "Satan Watches the Caresses of Adam and Eve" (1808).


Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Young black man warns Ferguson’s white establishment: ‘We’ve got the power — you don’t’

 You've always had the power homie. Your neighbors have always had the power. When so few black neighbors bother to vote then the very few white residents get voted into office. Yes this is powerful and I hope it gains traction. Too bad Michael Brown had to die for Ferguson's traumatized, beaten, abused and neglected residents to move forward with voting power. 

Does HE SPEAK the true feelings of his generation in Ferguson? Are young black and brown men and women ready to stop killing each other and start loving each other to improve their community? I'm scared for them. White power structures won't roll over so easily and the whites in charge will be looking to see whether this young man's radical politics attracts any attention from his peers.

_______________________________________

During the first city council meeting in Ferguson, Missouri since Officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, black residents powerfully responded to how the city dealt with the shooting.

WATCH HIS SPEECH AT 2:06 IN THE VIDEO LINK BELOW
 
A young man in a “Peace Keeper” t-shirt who introduced himself as “Mike Brown from Ground Zero” said that the problem with the white people at the meeting who claim to speak for the entire city “do not represent us.” Although whites only make up 29 percent of Ferguson’s population, five of the six sitting city council members are white, as is Mayor James Knowles.

“It is time for us to get suited and booted and kick their you-know-whats out of office,” he said. “We’ve got the power — they don’t. We’re trying to figure out how this man, that man, the old man — the Man, the Man, the Man up there on his iPad who don’t care what we have to say. How do we get him out? We vote him out! We recall him out!”

“A month ago, a young man was shot down several times, and that’s a fact,” the man said, alluding to a comment by an older, white male who earlier had yelled, “You want facts? I’ll give you facts!” 

“His body laid on that pavement for hours, and that’s a fact,” the young man continued. “All the videos, all the nonsense they try to put out there, but the facts are out there — and they’re still hiding behind one white officer. They are letting all this go on for one white officer.”

“But do you know what? We ought to thank them,” he said, “because it’s time for us to kick them out. They don’t care about us, that’s been proven. And they won’t care until we show them that we have the power to vote them out.”

The young man added that the white community has “been thinking for too long, that black people don’t love each other — that me and this brother,” he said, pointing to a fellow attendee, “can’t go out there and peacefully protest for our rights. But guess what? It happened, and it’s not going to stop. If we don’t get justice, young people are going to continue to stand up.”

“We’re not fighting each other anymore, that stuff is dead,” he said. “We’re fighting them, because they’ve been fighting us. And we won’t take it. We’re fired up! We’re fed up! We’re young! We’re strong!”

“So mayor,” he concluded, “you better enjoy that seat, because November is coming up, and you are out!”

via RAW STORY



Derrick Rose and James Harden Are Very Confused by New Zealand’s Pregame Haka

Last Tuesday in Bilbao, Spain, the United States moved to 3–0 at the FIBA Basketball World Cup by defeating New Zealand 98–71. Given that the United States is the United States, New Zealand is New Zealand, and basketball is basketball, the final score was something of a fait accompli. But what happened before the game seemed to come as a total surprise to the Americans. Watch and enjoy the video above, in which the “Tall Blacks”—a play on the nickname of New Zealand’s All Blacks rugby squad—perform the country’s traditional haka dance, and Derrick Rose, James Harden, and Kenneth Faried look very, very confused.


FREE! Discover PHOTOVILLE in Brooklyn Bridge Park

 
CALL + RESPONSE + RESPONSE Exhibition
 
Photoville, Pier 5, Brooklyn Bridge Park
September 18–September 28

Don't miss ICP at Photoville! We have been a programmatic partner of Photoville since the founding of the festival and will expand our presence this year with an installation as well as two workshops led by faculty from the School at ICP. Photoville takes place in Brooklyn Bridge Park from September 18–28, 2014.

CALL + RESPONSE + RESPONSE, presented by the 2015 ICP-Bard MFA students, is an immersive exhibition that demonstrates how photography operates as a conversational tool that initiates engagement and triggers discourse.


"As citizens of this planet we are constantly inundated with imagery, influenced by imagery, and creating imagery. Photography no longer holds as a declarative statement, but operates as a conversational tool—as a means of communicating beyond borders, languages, ethnicities, gender identities, and sexual orientations.

We are a collective of 13 artists united by the quest for personal, artistic, and intellectual development. We are more than just peers—we are comrades, confidants, brothers, sisters, mentors, and pupils. We are a community of artists united by the passion to create who believe that knowledge is gained from diverse opinions. We believe that nurturing and maintaining our connections with one another are imperative for our continual learning and growth—both individually and collectively.

Dog Star Selects ON THE TOWN

Broadway's On the Town Stars Re-create Iconic "New York, New York" Opening Number Around Manhattan

If you thought Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, and Frank Sinatra filled out sailor suits well, wait till you see Clyde Alves, Jay Armstrong Johnson, and Tony Yazbeck.

Late last month, On the Town stars danced around Manhattan in their sailor suits to film a promo video for the highly anticipated Broadway revival, which will play the Lyric Theatre beginning September 20. 

What they shot was a re-creation of the opening moments of the film On the Town, a music video of the classic and catchy tune "New York, New York." And you can check out the delightful fruits of their labor below.



Dog Star Selects SHARKS by Utagawa Kuniyoshi